People who earn more, have more sex, and vice versa

There is an interdependent relationship among making money, having sex, and being physically healthy, according to new research published in the International Journal of Manpower.

People who earn more, have more sex, and vice versa

There is an interdependent relationship among making money, having sex, and being physically healthy, according to new research published in the International Journal of Manpower.


The study found that workers who have sex two to three times per week earn an average of 4.5 percent more than coworkers who have sex less often. Based on a behavioral study that surveyed 7,500 individuals, researchers found that "workers with health problems who are sexually active earn 1.5 percent more than those with similar ailments who are not sexually active."

Dr. Nick Drydakis, who led the study from Anglia Ruskin University, concluded that having a higher income results in leading a more active sex life, and that having more sex supports our efforts at the office:

Does lack of sex lead to lower wages or lower wages lead to less sex? In the literature there are studies that have examined both effects. Celibacy results in lower wages, as well as lower wages leading to less sex. That is, we can provide socio-economic arguments and health- and mental health-based arguments in order to support both effects.

Drydakis also noted that it is the emotional effects of sex that improve our mental well-being such that we perform better at other tasks. So non-sexual forms of care are equally important to sustaining a healthy mental life that allows us to achieve our professional goals.

Without care and support, we fall victim to loneliness, anxiety, and depression, which in turn affects our performance in other areas of life.

But lest you think earning more money allows you to simply have more casual sex, Helen Fisher explains that a majority of men and women are looking to trigger a long-term relationship when they engage in sexual contact.

Your body’s full of stuff you no longer need. Here's a list.

Evolution doesn't clean up after itself very well.

Image source: Decade3d-anatomy online via Shutterstock
Surprising Science
  • An evolutionary biologist got people swapping ideas about our lingering vestigia.
  • Basically, this is the stuff that served some evolutionary purpose at some point, but now is kind of, well, extra.
  • Here are the six traits that inaugurated the fun.
Keep reading Show less

Godzilla vs. Kong: A morphologist chooses the real winner

Ultimately, this is a fight between a giant reptile and a giant primate.

Surprising Science

The 2021 film “Godzilla vs. Kong" pits the two most iconic movie monsters of all time against each other. And fans are now picking sides.

Keep reading Show less

How do you tell reality from a deepfake?

The more you see them, the better you get at spotting the signs.

ROB LEVER/AFP via Getty Images
Technology & Innovation
  • The number of deepfake videos online has been increasing at an estimated annual rate of about 900%.
  • Technology advances have made it increasingly easy to produce them, which has raised questions about how best to prevent malicious misuse.
  • It's been suggested that the best way to inoculate people against the danger of deepfakes is through exposure and raising awareness.
  • Keep reading Show less
    Surprising Science

    Ancient cave artists were getting high on hypoxia

    A new study says the reason cave paintings are in such remote caverns was the artists' search for transcendence.

    Quantcast