Doomsday Clock Ticks Forward to 3 Minutes to Midnight

The hands of the iconic “Doomsday Clock” have been moved to read 3 minutes from midnight or doomsday. The last time the world was 3 minutes to midnight was during the Cold War in 1984.

The hands of the iconic “Doomsday Clock” have been moved forward to read 3 minutes from midnight. The last time the world was 3 minutes to midnight was during the Cold War in 1984.


The metaphorical clock is managed by the Science and Security Board of The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and signals the grim outlook the group has on the world's future if attentions aren't paid to growing climate change and nuclear arsenals. Megan Gannon from Live Science reported that the board decided to move the time from 5 minutes to midnight where its hands have rested for the past three years--since 2012.

Granted, the board is by no means predicting the world's demise, rather the clock is used as a tool to warn the public about how close we are to a global catastrophe. It has been maintained as a symbol to the world since 1947 as a warning that humanity is deadly-close to a global disaster. After the Atomic Bombs were dropped in Japan, the clock has warned of nuclear disaster, but since 2007 the board has also considered the irreversible damages of climate change, adding the threat to their doomsday predictions. The furthest the clock has ever been from midnight was when it was moved to 11:43, when the Soviet Union and the United States signed the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty in 1991.

Since then the clock has been inching ever-forward. The lack of global action toward resolving the climate change crisis, which scientists predict the Earth will be 5 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit warmer by the end of century; there's also the he halted efforts of nations to scale back their nuclear arms; and rising global tensions have only convinced the board that the world needs to act in order to step back from this metaphorical ledge.

Kennette Benedict, Executive Director of The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists spoke to reporters in Washington D.C. about the board's decision:

"We are not saying it is too late to take action but the window for action is closing rapidly. We move the clock hand today to inspire action."

Read more at Live Science

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

26 ultra-rich people own as much as the world's 3.8 billion poorest

The Oxfam report prompted Anand Giridharadas to tweet: "Don't be Pinkered into everything's-getting-better complacency."

Getty Images and Wikimedia Commons
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new report by Oxfam argues that wealth inequality is causing poverty and misery around the world.
  • In the last year, the world's billionaires saw their wealth increase by 12%, while the poorest 3.8 billion people on the planet lost 11% of their wealth.
  • The report prompted Anand Giridharadas to tweet: "Don't be Pinkered into everything's-getting-better complacency." We explain what Steven Pinker's got to do with it.
Keep reading Show less

People who constantly complain are harmful to your health

Moans, groans, and gripes release stress hormones in the brain.

Photo credit: Getty Images / Stringer
popular

Could you give up complaining for a whole month? That's the crux of this interesting piece by Jessica Hullinger over at Fast Company. Hullinger explores the reasons why humans are so predisposed to griping and why, despite these predispositions, we should all try to complain less. As for no complaining for a month, that was the goal for people enrolled in the Complaint Restraint project.

Participants sought to go the entirety of February without so much as a moan, groan, or bellyache.

Keep reading Show less
Videos
  • Facebook and Google began as companies with supposedly noble purposes.
  • Creating a more connected world and indexing the world's information: what could be better than that?
  • But pressure to return value to shareholders came at the expense of their own users.
Keep reading Show less