Dogs in the Workplace Mean Better Mental Health

A survey conducted at a North Carolina business where dogs are regularly present suggests that employees have less stress, better morale and higher productivity in the presence of canines. 

Dogs in the Workplace Mean Better Mental Health

What's the Latest Development?


A scientific survey conducted at a North Carolina business where dogs are regularly present suggests that man's best friend can help reduce stress, build morale and increase productivity in the workplace. Over the course of the study, surveys completed and saliva samples given by the company's 550 employees led scientists to conclude that having (clean and well-behaved) pets in the office can improve individuals' experience at work. The study was recently published in the International Journal of Workplace Health Management

What's the Big Idea?

It seems humans can communicate with dogs in ways that offer emotional rewards impossible to glean from human to human interaction. Indeed, scientists believe unique human-dog communication is responsible for lowering the stress levels of employees who participated in the study. In some cases, employees without a dog were observed asking to take a co-worker's dog out for a break. "These were brief, positive exchanges as the dogs were taken and returned and also resulted in an employee break involving exercise." Pet presence is a low-cost way to substantially improve the workplace.

Photo credit: shutterstock.com


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