Technology Leadership and the International Scene

If one walks into any school in the United States, it is obvious that digital technologies are pervasive. It is impossible not to see students using laptops or netbooks, tablets such as iPads, and handheld devices such as iPods or cell phones. Some schools have embraced these devices and now allow students to use them as they see fit. Other schools have even gone so far as put one device in the hands of every child.


The school leader is at the nexus of this push. The school leader is the one who builds the infrastructure, secures the funds, sets policies, gains stakeholder buy in, and ensures these devices are used to enhance instructional practices. We at the Center for the Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education (CASTLE) have tirelessly worked with leaders to ensure that they 'get it' and that they understand how to roll out technology initiatives of any size.

If we look to the less developed world we do not always see these scenes. But a similar scene will be there...and soon. The One Lap Top Per Child initiative is just one example of a massive push to put digital technologies into the hands of students. For as many supporters of such initiatives, you will find an equal number of naysayers. I for one, hold cautious optimism.

With that said, next week CASTLE begins working with two local NGOs in Cambodia. CASTLE's task is to support local experts as they monitor, assess, and evaluate various technology and media initiatives. We are specifically tasked with building local capacity to conduct high quality research. We are super excited to be helping out. This initiative continues our international outreach. It is a clear signal that this nation is thinking about how best to use technologies not only in educational applications, but across society. We will keep you posted!

SpaceX catches Falcon Heavy nosecone with net-outfitted boat

It marks another milestone in SpaceX's long-standing effort to make spaceflight cheaper.

Technology & Innovation
  • SpaceX launched Falcon Heavy into space early Tuesday morning.
  • A part of its nosecone – known as a fairing – descended back to Earth using special parachutes.
  • A net-outfitted boat in the Atlantic Ocean successfully caught the reusable fairing, likely saving the company millions of dollars.
Keep reading Show less

Are these 100 people killing the planet?

Controversial map names CEOs of 100 companies producing 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

Image: Jordan Engel, reused via Decolonial Media License 0.1
Strange Maps
  • Just 100 companies produce 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gases.
  • This map lists their names and locations, and their CEOs.
  • The climate crisis may be too complex for these 100 people to solve, but naming and shaming them is a good start.
Keep reading Show less

‘Climate apartheid’: Report says the rich could buy out of climate change disaster

The world's richest people could breeze through a climate disaster – for a price.

(Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new report from a United Nation expert warns that an over-reliance on the private sector to mitigate climate change could cause a "climate apartheid."
  • The report criticizes several countries, including the U.S., for taking "short-sighted steps in the wrong direction."
  • The world's poorest populations are most vulnerable to climate change even though they generally contribute the least to global emissions.
Keep reading Show less