StorkStand Provides One Of The Easiest Ways To Shift Your Workplace Into A Standing One

StorkStand Provides One Of The Easiest Ways To Shift Your Workplace Into A Standing One

Sitting at a desk and being inactive for long periods of time is bad for you, both in terms of health and productivity. Study after study shows it and yet there’s not much left for the office worker to do about it. Unless you're working for a hip startup, you're unlikely to find standing desks at your workplace. At the same time makeshift contraptions such as a stack of binders on top of your desk might not be the most elegant or appropriate solution.


StorkStand attempts to solve this problem. It's a mobile desk that can turn any office chair into a workstation. Actually, calling it a desk is a bit of a stretch, as the device’s dimensions are 17" wide by 15.5" deep and it can comfortably hold up to a 17” laptop.  It is, however, very sturdy, able to hold up to 50 lbs and can easily be installed on the back of an office chair.

StorkStand claims to be “the most affordable standing desk” on the market, and indeed, compared to the prices of most standing desks that usually run north of $1,000, StorkStand’s $199 might sound really good. Compared to Ikea’s latest standing desk offering, which starts at $489.99 and is also easily adjustable from sitting to a standing position, the price tag might not seem as inviting. Still, the best advantage of StorkStand is its mobility. For those who have flexible working locations it can provide a sure way to keep up with their standing-while-working routines.

Images: StorkStand

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