Web 4.0: The Ultra-Intelligent Electronic Agent is Coming

The evolution of the Web today is happening faster than the transition from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 due to processing power, bandwidth and storage, "creating a curve of exponential change."

Web 4.0: The Ultra-Intelligent Electronic Agent is Coming

Without getting too far ahead of ourselves, it is useful to look back at the various iterations of the Internet to see how it has evolved and where we might reasonably expect to see it go in the coming years and decades. 


The defining aspect of Web 1.0 was search. In other words, think Yahoo! in the early 1990s. Web 2.0 is social media, which involves collaborative projects like Wikipedia, social networking sites like Facebook, blogs and micro-blogs like Twitter and many other examples. So what’s Web 3.0? According to the futurist and business strategist and Big Think blogger Daniel Burrus, this is all happening faster than the transition from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 due to processing power, bandwidth and storage, "creating a curve of exponential change."
So Burrus describes the third iteration of the Web as "the 3D Web." By that does he mean 3D glasses? No. "We already have that with video games where you go in to environments in 3D," Burrus says. "What you’re going to see is "3D on phones and tablets coming up very shortly." Burrus says the real game-changer will be the 3D web browser: "You can go into inter-spatial places. You can go into rooms, in to convention centers, in to showrooms." 

So what about Web 4.0? Will that be coming along soon? 

Watch the video here:

Your body’s full of stuff you no longer need. Here's a list.

Evolution doesn't clean up after itself very well.

Image source: Decade3d-anatomy online via Shutterstock
Surprising Science
  • An evolutionary biologist got people swapping ideas about our lingering vestigia.
  • Basically, this is the stuff that served some evolutionary purpose at some point, but now is kind of, well, extra.
  • Here are the six traits that inaugurated the fun.
Keep reading Show less

The cost of world peace? It's much less than the price of war

The world's 10 most affected countries are spending up to 59% of their GDP on the effects of violence.

Mario Tama/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Conflict and violence cost the world more than $14 trillion a year.
  • That's the equivalent of $5 a day for every person on the planet.
  • Research shows that peace brings prosperity, lower inflation and more jobs.
  • Just a 2% reduction in conflict would free up as much money as the global aid budget.
  • Report urges governments to improve peacefulness, especially amid COVID-19.
Keep reading Show less

The evolution of modern rainforests began with the dinosaur-killing asteroid

The lush biodiversity of South America's rainforests is rooted in one of the most cataclysmic events that ever struck Earth.

Velociraptor Dinosaur in the Rainforest

meen_na via Adobe Stock
Surprising Science
  • One especially mysterious thing about the asteroid impact, which killed the dinosaurs, is how it transformed Earth's tropical rainforests.
  • A recent study analyzed ancient fossils collected in modern-day Colombia to determine how tropical rainforests changed after the bolide impact.
  • The results highlight how nature is able to recover from cataclysmic events, though it may take millions of years.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast