Web 4.0: The Ultra-Intelligent Electronic Agent is Coming

The evolution of the Web today is happening faster than the transition from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 due to processing power, bandwidth and storage, "creating a curve of exponential change."

Web 4.0: The Ultra-Intelligent Electronic Agent is Coming

Without getting too far ahead of ourselves, it is useful to look back at the various iterations of the Internet to see how it has evolved and where we might reasonably expect to see it go in the coming years and decades. 


The defining aspect of Web 1.0 was search. In other words, think Yahoo! in the early 1990s. Web 2.0 is social media, which involves collaborative projects like Wikipedia, social networking sites like Facebook, blogs and micro-blogs like Twitter and many other examples. So what’s Web 3.0? According to the futurist and business strategist and Big Think blogger Daniel Burrus, this is all happening faster than the transition from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 due to processing power, bandwidth and storage, "creating a curve of exponential change."
So Burrus describes the third iteration of the Web as "the 3D Web." By that does he mean 3D glasses? No. "We already have that with video games where you go in to environments in 3D," Burrus says. "What you’re going to see is "3D on phones and tablets coming up very shortly." Burrus says the real game-changer will be the 3D web browser: "You can go into inter-spatial places. You can go into rooms, in to convention centers, in to showrooms." 

So what about Web 4.0? Will that be coming along soon? 

Watch the video here:

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