Remembering Sally Ride: Risk-Taker, Achiever, Icon

"I would like to be remembered as someone who was not afraid to do what she wanted to do, and as someone who took risks along the way in order to achieve her goals."

Remembering Sally Ride: Risk-Taker, Achiever, Icon

Sally Ride (1951-2012) was the first American woman in space. While that, in and of itself, is her primary claim to fame, Ride made notable contributions in physics, philanthropy, and as a member of the committees that investigated the two space shuttle disasters. In 2001, Ride and her partner Tam O’Shaughnessy co-founded Sally Ride Science, a company dedicated to inspiring young people in STEM and promoting STEM literacy. More than anything, Ride's legacy serves as an inspiration for women, young girls, and members of the LGBT community interested in STEM careers.


Sally Ride would have been 64 years old today. She is the focus of today's Google doodle

"I would like to be remembered as someone who was not afraid to do what she wanted to do, and as someone who took risks along the way in order to achieve her goals."

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ESA
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Getty Images
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Photo by Jessica D. Vega on Unsplash
Culture & Religion
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