Liberty Is the Right to Be Honest

Words of Wisdom from Cuban national hero José Martí: "Liberty is the right of every man to be honest, to think, and to speak without hypocrisy. ... A man who obeys a bad government is not an honest man."

Liberty Is the Right to Be Honest

José Martí (1853-1895) was a Cuban national hero and indelible figure in Latin American literary history. He was a poet, publisher, journalist, essayist, translator, revolutionary philosopher, professor, and political theorist. He was celebrated as a symbol for Cuba's bid for independence against Spain and is regarded as the "Apostle of Cuban Independence." 


Not too long ago, we used this space to discuss the amorphous nature of liberty, a word that resonates much more in people's hearts than in their heads. The always-cerebral José Martí was able to pin down what liberty meant to him:

"Liberty is the right of every man to be honest, to think and to speak without hypocrisy. ... A man who obeys a bad government is not an honest man."

An artist's depiction of Lola.

Tom Björklund
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A study finds that baby mammals dream about the world they are about to experience to prepare their senses.

Neonatal waves.

Michael C. Crair et al, Science, 2021.
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The non-contact technique could someday be used to lift much heavier objects — maybe even humans.

Levitation by hemispherical transducer arrays.

Kondo and Okubo, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 2021.
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