Facing Adversity? Allow Maya Angelou to Inspire You.

Words of wisdom from Maya Angelou: "I can be changed by what happens to me. But I refuse to be reduced by it."

Maya Angelou (1928-2014) was an African-American poet and author most famous for her landmark 1969 book I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the first of seven autobiographical accounts of her incredible life.


Angelou was and still is revered for her sage wisdom and keen insights into race, class, and self-determination. The quote below reflects her steadfast demeanor: She would not let the external ills over which she had little control affect how she felt about herself. As likely as we are to run into adversity, it's important to maintain composure when it comes around. The surface may change; the stuff on the inside remains the same.

There are no shortcuts.

We are fortunate to have author and talk show host Tavis Smiley among our many Big Think Experts. Smiley recently published a book titled My Journey with Mayaa recollection of his 30-year friendship with the iconic American poet. Below, Smiley discusses some of Angelou's most helpful pieces of advice:

Got a question for a real NASA astronomer? Ask it here!

NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller is coming back to Big Think to answer YOUR questions! Here's all you need to know to submit your science-related inquiries.

Surprising Science

Big Think's amazing audience has responded so well to our videos from NASA astronomer and Assistant Director for Science Communication Michelle Thaller that we couldn't wait to bring her back for more!

And this time, she's ready to tackle any questions you're willing to throw at her, like, "How big is the Universe?", "Am I really made of stars?" or, "How long until Elon Musk starts a colony on Mars?"

All you have to do is submit your questions to the form below, and we'll use them for an upcoming Q+A session with Michelle. You know what to do, Big Thinkers!

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(Photo from Wikimedia)
Personal Growth
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