Who are you?

Question: Who are you?

Richard Armitage: My name is Rich Armitage. I’m not the President of Armitage International. I was previously the Deputy Secretary of State, and before that the Assistant Secretary of Defense.I was born in Boston and I grew up in Decatur, Georgia. I guess it made me a big sports fan, actually. Because if you live in the South, it’s a mad football area. It … Football was the sport that I played through high school. It got me a scholarship to college, which happened to be the U.S. Naval Academy. I would say I had a football coach by the name of George Maloof who is still alive in Atlanta, Georgia. He was a great Sugar Bowl and touchdown scorer for Georgia Tech years and years ago. He taught me a lot about sticking to things and giving 110%. The piece of advice I received when I was young came from my father. And it was, “Always tell the truth. That way you won’t have to remember what you told anyone.”

Recorded on: 9/14/07

Armitage strives to live his life in truth.

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