What are the big issues?

Question: What are the big issues?

D. Quinn M ills: I read the newspaper and watch the news a great deal, and I'm looking for certain things. I'm looking one to keep myself in formed as to what is going on. Secondly, I am looking for what are the major trends and developments that are going on, I never read or listen except critically. One of the great weaknesses of American education and I think education in most of the world today is we don’t train people to be critical in their thinking. If they read something, they accept it--most of them do--they do not think through it and think about, “is this accurate, why did this persons say this,” but that's not consistent with what I just looked at yesterday or what this person said before. So I always read critically and when I am looking for a major trends and significant in consistencies, because, where there are consistencies, that tells me that there going to be problems.

Recorded on: 9/27/07

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mills never reads or listens except critically.

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Is technology corrupting humanity? History says no.

Build up, tear down—new technology stirs up a cycle of progress and cynicism we've seen all throughout history.

Videos
  • "Every time that there's a new technology, particularly around media, there's a set of outcries around how that media is corrupting culture or how it's destroying certain aspects of our life," says entrepreneur and author Elad Gil.
  • In some cases there are real concerns, but taking a historical view can quell unnecessary panic. Progress and cynicism work in a cyclical fashion, says Gil. New tech is unveiled, the media builds it up, then the media tears it down in a wave of backlash.
  • Today we worry about kids and smartphones; 80 years ago we worried about kids and the radio; same cynicism, different day.
  • Technology lifts the lid on human potential and quality of life, says Gil. We should be cautious, of course, but optimism is more valuable (and arguably more rational) than pessimism.
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