Strange Story From A Renowned Sexologist

Topic: Strange story from a renowned sexologist.

Michael Perelman: Some of the strangest things that I have encountered are because the doctors themselves are not asking questions. For instance, one young man was referred by a dermatologist because he had these horrible sores all over his penis, and no one knew the origin of this, and it caused him to withdraw socially and he was afraid to engage in any sexual experiences with a partner, at least as the dermatologist and his primary care physician understood it. I took a sexual history and one of the questions I always ask is tell me about your last sexual experience, and I also ask about the last time you masturbated yourself and what technique do you use when you masturbate? This poor man, who was so anxious at work, would lock his door and rub himself against this industrial carpeting on his office floor and severely burn and abrade his penis, which he didn’t notice because he was aroused, until after he had ejaculated, he would find these sores, and then, of course, they were very tender. And he was humiliated at the thought of telling anyone about this, yet he went to the dermatologist and his primary care physician in the hope of finding relief, some kind of medication, that would take away these burns or at least alleviate the pain that he was experiencing, and yet he had a problem with compulsive masturbation. In part, he found that it was a relief for the high anxiety he experienced at work. So this was a multidimensional problem. And we were able to fix this by helping him learn better skills to cope with work, develop an alternative pattern of masturbation, limit the frequency of masturbation, and eventually get him dating, having sexual experiences with other partners. He is now married and has two kids and he limits his sexual experiences primarily to those with his wife with some occasional masturbation, using the technique most people would find more conventional.

 

Sometimes the doctors aren't asking the right questions, Perelman says.

Ideology drives us apart. Neuroscience can bring us back together.

A guide to making difficult conversations possible—and peaceful—in an increasingly polarized nation.

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  • How can we reach out to people on the other side of the divide? Get to know the other person as a human being before you get to know them as a set of tribal political beliefs, says Sarah Ruger. Don't launch straight into the difficult topics—connect on a more basic level first.
  • To bond, use icebreakers backed by neuroscience and psychology: Share a meal, watch some comedy, see awe-inspiring art, go on a tough hike together—sharing tribulation helps break down some of the mental barriers we have between us. Then, get down to talking, putting your humanity before your ideology.
  • The Charles Koch Foundation is committed to understanding what drives intolerance and the best ways to cure it. The foundation supports interdisciplinary research to overcome intolerance, new models for peaceful interactions, and experiments that can heal fractured communities. For more information, visit charleskochfoundation.org/courageous-collaborations.

How to split the USA into two countries: Red and Blue

Progressive America would be half as big, but twice as populated as its conservative twin.

Image: Dicken Schrader
Strange Maps
  • America's two political tribes have consolidated into 'red' and 'blue' nations, with seemingly irreconcilable differences.
  • Perhaps the best way to stop the infighting is to go for a divorce and give the two nations a country each
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Why a federal judge ordered White House to restore Jim Acosta's press badge

A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration likely violated the reporter's Fifth Amendment rights when it stripped his press credentials earlier this month.

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 16: CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta (R) returns to the White House with CNN Washington bureau chief Sam Feist after Federal judge Timothy J. Kelly ordered the White House to reinstate his press pass November 16, 2018 in Washington, DC. CNN has filed a lawsuit against the White House after Acosta's press pass was revoked after a dispute involving a news conference last week. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Acosta will be allowed to return to the White House on Friday.
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