Sloan Crosley's Guilty Pleasures

Question: Do you write about sex?

Crosley: I don’t think I’ve ever really written about sex. I’ve written about the idea of sex. I guess in its own way everything is about the idea of sex as much as we pretend it’s not. Everything you’ve mentioned, Gawker, God, it’s pretty much all about the idea of sex. But I think it’s one of these things you have to really know what you’re doing and I should clarify instantly that I don’t mean the actual act itself. But when portraying it, I think it’s similar to describing war or love or anything that’s been trodden on in literature many, many, many times before, so you don’t sound cliché so it does sound right for you. Similarly, I think those things should be used judiciously unless you’re writing a romance novel, in which case you should just take off the brakes and just write about heaving bosoms until you’re blue in the face. But for a normal person writing anything that’s not explicitly about sex, I think it’s just very difficult and I haven’t encountered a reason to write excessively about it.

Question: What is your favorite television show ever?

Crosley: My favorite television show ever, that is tough. I’m going to say it’s a tie, a three way tie between Twin Peaks, the original Wonder Woman and Out of This World. Did you ever watch that show? It’s with Evie, who’s like half alien and she could freeze time and I wanted to do that so badly in a 100 different instances in 8th and 9th grade. You could just stick your fingers together like this and freeze time. It was great because in the opening credits, they would show the powers she had in action and she’d come walking into a room and she’d open the door and there’d be a ladder with a bucketful of paint on it because that’s where you keep a ladder and a full bucket of paint, is right where the front doorway opens. She would bump into it and they’d show the paint spill and she would very quickly do this and it would stop and it was so funny because it’s like a demonstration of her powers but at the second she undoes that, the paint’s going to spill everywhere. It never made any sense to me but I’m very nostalgic about that show mostly because it’s kind of an obscure ‘80s show but I think enough people remember it. Now, I guess it doesn’t even really count. I guess in the recent past, I loved Arrested Development. Who didn’t? I thought it was genius. And now, I don’t have Tivo so TV watching is very difficult. I don’t really think I have any favorite shows that I’m addicted to because I don’t get cable. I live in like a cave. I don’t get cable and so I don’t get MTV so I just rented the second season of The Hills. I figure from like tabloids, I’d kind of piece together who everyone was and didn’t need the first season. But I rented the second season of The Hills. It wasn’t that good. It wasn’t even like bad good.

Everything, says Crosley, is about the idea of sex.

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