Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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Seth Berkley's Stories From the Field

Seth Berkley:  For me, the really exciting thing is when we started IAVI, a lot of people said you can’t go to poor communities in sub-Saharan Africa and get this type of research done. It should be done close to academic centers in the west. For me, we’ve proven the opposite. The level of engagement on the ground and then the quality of work -- we’ve recently had our laboratories in Africa have been not only validated but accredited and they’ve done fabulously. So the work there is done better than it is, or at least as good as, in anywhere else in the world. So seeing a team like that come together and the pride that exists and the hard work-- And the reason they perform so well is because they’re living in their community and seeing it. They all have stories to tell. And that to me has been my, in a sense, proudest moment. Let me give you another example of something that was interesting. We recently began to work with a group of male sex workers in east Africa. When I lived Uganda, it was said that homosexuality in Africa was almost unheard of and it is very rare. It’s not something that’s well condoned and all of that. So here was a group of sex workers who had been doing it, have been operating there and to see them engaged in wanting to get involved in this and having them celebrate with each other and the ability even to be open about it and talk about it, and to even see the other investigators in the setting to see them and feel uncomfortable in a setting because the investigators hadn’t dealt with their own concerns about it -- but to see that kind of bonding and sharing was really exciting.

Question: Have you ever been in danger?

Seth Berkley:  We certainly have to be extremely careful on discussing these things and talking about them. Early on one of my hardest experiences was when I first went to Casin Sero [ph?], which is the place where AIDS was first documented on the African continent. It’s where the slim disease-- And on the way down there, we were ambushed and the car behind us, somebody was shot in the head and being the only doctor, I had to provide medical care and spend the night sleeping in the clinic where the first cases were diagnosed, not knowing whether these guys were going to come back and try to get us, and eventually sending for help in a canoe getting soldiers to come and help escort us out. The answer is I’ve certainly been in situations that’s it’s been pretty trying. The other side of it is that when you deal with your investigators, your people, everybody has a story. When you’re there and you spend time with them, they’ll tell you about their brothers and sisters and others who have died from this disease and to watch the amazing dedication that occurs by having that incredible connection-- You ask people why are you doing this, why are you so in, they say “I don’t want my child to grow up in the fear in this situation,” and so it’s just an amazing commitment.

Berkley says the level of engagement on the ground and the quality of work has been validated and accredited.

The “new normal” paradox: What COVID-19 has revealed about higher education

Higher education faces challenges that are unlike any other industry. What path will ASU, and universities like ASU, take in a post-COVID world?

Photo: Luis Robayo/AFP via Getty Images
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Everywhere you turn, the idea that coronavirus has brought on a "new normal" is present and true. But for higher education, COVID-19 exposes a long list of pernicious old problems more than it presents new problems.
  • It was widely known, yet ignored, that digital instruction must be embraced. When combined with traditional, in-person teaching, it can enhance student learning outcomes at scale.
  • COVID-19 has forced institutions to understand that far too many higher education outcomes are determined by a student's family income, and in the context of COVID-19 this means that lower-income students, first-generation students and students of color will be disproportionately afflicted.
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Creativity: The science behind the madness

Human brains evolved for creativity. We just have to learn how to access it.

Videos
  • An all-star cast of Big Thinkers—actors Rainn Wilson and Ethan Hawke; composer Anthony Brandt; neuroscientists David Eagleman, Wendy Suzuki, and Beau Lotto; and psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman—share how they define creativity and explain how our brains uniquely evolved for the phenomenon.
  • According to Eagleman, during evolution there was an increase in space between our brain's input and output that allows information more time to percolate. We also grew a larger prefrontal cortex which "allows us to simulate what ifs, to separate ourselves from our location in space and time and think about possibilities."
  • Scott Barry Kaufman details 3 brain networks involved in creative thinking, and Wendy Suzuki busts the famous left-brain, right-brain myth.

New study explores how to navigate 'desire discrepancies' in long term relationships

With the most common form of female sexual dysfunction impacting 1 in 10 women, this important study dives into how to keep a relationship going despite having different needs and wants in the bedroom.

NDAB Creativity / Shutterstock
Sex & Relationships
  • A new study highlights the difficulties faced by women who struggle with decreased sexual desire, and explains how to navigate desire discrepancies in long-term relationships.
  • Hypoactive sexual desire disorder is one of the most common forms of female sexual dysfunction, impacting an estimated 1 in 10 women.
  • Finding other ways to promote intimacy in your relationship is one of the keys to ensuring happiness on both sides.
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What if Middle-earth was in Pakistan?

Iranian Tolkien scholar finds intriguing parallels between subcontinental geography and famous map of Middle-earth.

Image: Mohammad Reza Kamali, reproduced with kind permission
Strange Maps
  • J.R.R. Tolkien hinted that his stories are set in a really ancient version of Europe.
  • But a fantasy realm can be inspired by a variety of places; and perhaps so is Tolkien's world.
  • These intriguing similarities with Asian topography show that it may be time to 'decolonise' Middle-earth.
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Dinosaur bone? Meteorite? These men's wedding bands are a real break from boredom.

Manly Bands wanted to improve on mens' wedding bands. Mission accomplished.

Sex & Relationships
  • Manly Bands was founded in 2016 to provide better options and customer service in men's wedding bands.
  • Unique materials include antler, dinosaur bones, meteorite, tungsten, and whiskey barrels.
  • The company donates a portion of profits to charity every month.
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