Re: Where are we?

The environment is a huge issue that I think we all can do our part in solving the disarray that ________ turned around in the world is really terrifying. And you know, and very selfishly and very self-involved in our own . . . in the U.S.A just sort of what the fads are, and escapism. It’s really fascinating what people use to . . . what people find humorous; what people find . . . what things people use to distract themselves from sort of the chaotic times. Our world is in . . . the state of our world is now . . . I mean I don’t believe that . . . I don’t believe that we’re living in a time necessarily that has more conflicts than ancient past history. There are many cultures and civilizations changing; but I think that because the world has gotten so small and communication is so fast, that it creates everything at a much larger scale. The world is in communication at all moments all around where it’s an orb around an orb, the communication. It’s not point-to-point. I think the largest challenge, you know, ahead will definitely be to see how every person individually in this time of individual style can affect the environment and remember that they have their own voice – that every voice matters. I think challenges of the U.S. are, you know, first off, you know I think the greatest challenge of the U.S. right now is creating . . . is having their eyes open and creating dialogue with the rest of the orb. And then looking within its own land and figuring out a system, you know, that supports growth in a healthy way for its people. And evolution doesn’t, you know . . . Things don’t have to be new. They just have to evolve and grow. And then preservation of its own country and own culture. You know _____ a very short-lived country. And it was a different form before . . . And so you know I think it’s very important for people to listen to each other in the country. Well I think, you know, international relations are, you know . . . are an enormous issue right now. I think the environment has to be a huge issue. The United States through economics is a huge, you know, powerful force and a huge contributor to pollution. I believe that, you know . . . I think those are really the two largest issues for me. And how people . . . I think it’s really important for clarity and brevity. And speaking . . . And being very straightforward. It’s very frustrating to believe in a system that is so convoluted and trying to be manipulative without using really visceral song and dance. Recorded on: 7/31/07

America needs to open its eyes and its ears.

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