Re: What inspires you?

My creative process is really exploring ideas that I’m interested in at the time. And then intensive research, which can become literal research or abstract in terms of just form, or texture and shape. And then I build on a woman three dimensionally with fabric, and form, and textures, and sewing techniques that I build in my studio. And then I work with my team on sort of building that up into a collection. I treat it in acts in a very theatrical way in terms of the sequence of our collection and our show, and where it starts and where it begins, or does it go in reverse or backwards. It’s like cooking a meal. It’s so varied. I often find my inspiration through play. Gene Kelly. ‘Cause he persevered, and he was. . . he had no fear.. Before . . . Well there’s certain pieces before clothing. There’s the snake goddess, sort of page 4 of Gardner’s our history book. And you know, there’s great clothing and _______ paintings, _______ paintings. And there’s . . . Of actual designers, which is only about 150 year old idea – fashion designer – I really have an incredible admiration for designer Madeline Vionet. And then it goes to Crystal Balenciaga. I mean so from there, we’re going from really fluid, foreign, sort of the invention of glamour, of looking at goddess-like women into sort of goddess forms, because they’re just totally constructed simplicity. And from . . . And then they became quite abstract. They’re large gestures of personality in the clothing, where Vionet was about bringing out the character of the woman. Then from there, I go to Issey Miyaki, and then to Yohji Yamamoto, Yves St. Laurent. He sort of . . . Yves St. Laurent created modern fashion – the idea of what a collection should feel like about haute couture versus ready to wear; and the formula of what a fashion show should look like and being in touch with the culture – brining street clothing into high fashion. He was, you know . . . I like the dreamers. Then I go to John _______, who sort of revitalized romanticism and dreaming. And fashion, besides the utilitarian part of it, is not a necessity for people. I mean it is a thrill of life. It’s not something necessarily necessary in order to live in any way. It’s an art form. It has patronage. It has financial signifiers attached to it. So you know, I like the designers who sort of surpassed that, or make fun of that, or have that humor – or just great sculptors _________. Well I think it’s an amazing time in fashion. We’re at a transition moment, which usually happens after the turning of the century. You know, I think, you know puppies, babies, and you know, plastic surgery are the new fashion.

Yves St. Laurent created modern fashion, Posen says.

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