Re: What defines great design?

Question: What defines great design?

Andrew Spade: I think you can define it different ways. I mean one way to define it is if it works. Like a great pair of jeans, it works and it functions. It has a functional part to it depending on what it’s designed for. And this is designed . . . I mean these were designed for that purpose, and I think that has succeeded. If it’s for, I guess, show . . . you know, to have people talk about it, then I think it’s successful if it generates that, you know? I mean for me, I mean I like equally the dime store flip flop that costs $2.00 as good as any one designed by a European designer. I think a flip flop should just be that. And I think that a jean should be that. I don’t think it needs ornamentation. I think its original purpose was to last a long time, and to get better with age, and to do that. It doesn’t need any more. Some people think it looks better when you add things to it and play with it, which is fine. But I think they should be left alone. But I also love when someone changes how clothing functions. For example, people in NASA would say, “I wanna make sure I can breathe in this shirt when I’m in 140 degree weather.” Those kinds of things really excite me. Or just like simple shirts that you can play tennis in. Or simple things that really work. I am . . . I’ve never been inspired by the flamboyance of fashion, although I think it’s really interesting. I appreciate it. I love seeing David Bowie as Ziggy Stardust. I love all those moments, you know? The costumes that Mick Jagger wears are amazing. I mean if you go back and look at these costumers, they’re incredible. And I have to say I really appreciate them. And they . . . and they do look great on a lot of people. And I think that’s all fashion. I think all of it is fashion. And that’s what I see.

Recorded on: 7/12/07

One way to define it is if it works.

A dark matter hurricane is crashing into Earth

Giving our solar system a "slap in the face"

Surprising Science
  • A stream of galactic debris is hurtling at us, pulling dark matter along with it
  • It's traveling so quickly it's been described as a hurricane of dark matter
  • Scientists are excited to set their particle detectors at the onslffaught
Keep reading Show less

Science confirms: Earth has more than one 'moon'

Two massive clouds of dust in orbit around the Earth have been discussed for years and finally proven to exist.

J. Sliz-Balogh, A. Barta and G. Horvath
Surprising Science
  • Hungarian astronomers have proven the existence of two "pseudo-satellites" in orbit around the earth.
  • These dust clouds were first discovered in the sixties, but are so difficult to spot that scientists have debated their existence since then.
  • The findings may be used to decide where to put satellites in the future and will have to be considered when interplanetary space missions are undertaken.
Keep reading Show less

New study reveals what time we burn the most calories

Once again, our circadian rhythm points the way.

Photo: Victor Freitas / Unsplash
Surprising Science
  • Seven individuals were locked inside a windowless, internetless room for 37 days.
  • While at rest, they burned 130 more calories at 5 p.m. than at 5 a.m.
  • Morning time again shown not to be the best time to eat.
Keep reading Show less