How can business leaders incentivize their employees?

Question: What are your hopes for TOMS future?

Blake Mycoskie: I think that, with TOMS [Shoes], we’re at that stage that you get to, as an entrepreneur, where we’re just reaching, just beginning to really take off.

Even though we’ve been in business two years, we’ve given away 65,000 shoes, we’ll give away 200,000 shoes this year, we’re helping a lot of people. But I still think it’s just the beginning.

There are deals out there for us to do with big companies as partners where we could give away millions of shoes. And that scaleability; we have 29 employees today [April 2008]. A year ago, we only had eight employees. So a year from now, we might have 100 employees.

For me, as an entrepreneur, it’s really focusing on getting systems in place for this explosive growth that’s getting ready to happen and spending my time building relationships with  CEOs and other companies that can benefit for participating in the TOMS Shoes model.

 

Recorded on: April 28, 2008

 

 

 

The voluntourism example.

SpaceX catches Falcon Heavy nosecone with net-outfitted boat

It marks another milestone in SpaceX's long-standing effort to make spaceflight cheaper.

Technology & Innovation
  • SpaceX launched Falcon Heavy into space early Tuesday morning.
  • A part of its nosecone – known as a fairing – descended back to Earth using special parachutes.
  • A net-outfitted boat in the Atlantic Ocean successfully caught the reusable fairing, likely saving the company millions of dollars.
Keep reading Show less

Are these 100 people killing the planet?

Controversial map names CEOs of 100 companies producing 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

Image: Jordan Engel, reused via Decolonial Media License 0.1
Strange Maps
  • Just 100 companies produce 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gases.
  • This map lists their names and locations, and their CEOs.
  • The climate crisis may be too complex for these 100 people to solve, but naming and shaming them is a good start.
Keep reading Show less

‘Climate apartheid’: Report says the rich could buy out of climate change disaster

The world's richest people could breeze through a climate disaster – for a price.

(Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new report from a United Nation expert warns that an over-reliance on the private sector to mitigate climate change could cause a "climate apartheid."
  • The report criticizes several countries, including the U.S., for taking "short-sighted steps in the wrong direction."
  • The world's poorest populations are most vulnerable to climate change even though they generally contribute the least to global emissions.
Keep reading Show less