Gaston Caperton on Standardized Testing

Question: Is the SAT an adequate measure of performance?

Caperton:    If you want to prepare for the SAT, the best way to prepare is to do your work everyday.  You don’t…  It isn’t…  It isn’t what you do in the senior year before you take the SAT or the junior before you take an SAT that you prepare for the SAT.  I mean, the Reading part of it, and the more you read, the better you do on it.  The Math part, the more you study Mathematics and work at Mathematics, the better you do on it.  I don't know how you can run an admissions process in the United States where the school have the choice of what students they invite to come to their schools.  Unless you have some sort of objective measurement, I don't think it should be the only measure, but you need some objective measurement because an A in one school certainly isn’t what an A is in another school, so if you just use grades, that’s not a good enough criteria.  Now, you have to look at what the student has done, the recommendations that they get from their teachers and their schools, but you’d need one objective test that allows you to see, with other students, what, how well a student has done on that test, and there’s obviously a correlation between how well a student does on an SAT and how well they’re prepared to go to college and succeed. 

Question: What changes would you like to see with the SAT?

Caperton:    Well, I think the one thing that I would say is I don’t want somebody just to rely on the SAT.  I want them, the more information they can get about a student, the more they understand the student body they want to have, the better it is.  I don't think this SAT is the beginning and end of the admissions process.  I just think it’s an important objective tool that statistically has proven to be very helpful in that admissions process and very much part of fairness.

Gaston Caperton says the best preparation for the SAT involves doing your homework everyday.

Scientists claim the Bible is written in code that predicts future events

The controversy around the Torah codes gets a new life.

Michael Drosnin
Surprising Science
  • Mathematicians claim to see a predictive pattern in the ancient Torah texts.
  • The code is revealed by a method found with special computer software.
  • Some events described by reading the code took place after the code was written.
Keep reading Show less

The mystery of Jesus’ brother gets even weirder

The controversy over whether Jesus had any siblings is reignited after an amazing new discovery of an ancient text.

Jesus and James. Unknown painter. Possibly 14th century.
Politics & Current Affairs
Keep reading Show less

Orangutans exhibit awareness of the past

Orangutans join humans and bees in a very exclusive club

(Eugene Sim/Shutterstock)
Surprising Science
  • Orangutan mothers wait to sound a danger alarm to avoid tipping off predators to their location
  • It took a couple of researchers crawling around the Sumatran jungle to discover the phenomenon
  • This ability may come from a common ancestor
Keep reading Show less