This is 2009 right?

A news article from New Zealand, more relevant to the dark ages. http://www.stuff.co.nz/the press/news/christchurch/2746441/Faith-healers-attack-cancer-with-prayer

In a series of news articles I stumbled across in the last 2 weeks it is sadly apparent the deep levels of superstition needed to sustain faith in secular progressive countries is still in tact. New Zealand provides this gem. A faith healing 'surgery' where people are treated as patients and prayed over (preyed?) by Xtian preachers in the name of the invisible sky wizard of love. It's an outrage that this stuff can be legal in this day and age, but where is the uproar?


Australia can not afford to laugh too hard at our Kiwi bro's, we were recently treated to the spectacle of Catholic Archbishop Pell (one of Ratsi's hard men), bedecked in his richest silken flowing frock and baubles championing the case of a dead nun (who spent her life in penury) he says she should be made a saint because she cured cancer in some woman 80 years ago, that's 20 years after she died! The number crunchers at the Vatican are currently looking at certifying a second such miracle for her to get the official nod. Now there's a rigourous scientific process. Of course the fact that people go into remission with cancer for no explicable reason quite often will make no impact on them, much better to attribute it to a mythical dead Jewish messiah claimant and a dead nun.

Speaking of our Jewish friends... try this: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8196807.stm

a group of Rabbis in a plane over Israel praying like hell to ward off the H1N1 virus. Swine flu to the rest of the world, but God hates pigs so no mention of pork please. Monty Python are now redundant with material like this.

Gawd help us!

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