The Purpose Economy

Imperative CEO Aaron Hurst describes we our evolving from an information economy to an economy of purpose. Hurst is the author of The Purpose Economy: How Your Desire for Impact, Personal Growth and Community Is Changing the World

The Purpose Economy

We only have one life to live--we have to make it count. No other generation has encompassed this conviction than Millennials. Sure, they get a lot of slack for perhaps having unrealistic expectations or impatience, but one thing they should get credit for is driving the purpose economy.


Today, young people want their careers to do more than just bring in a paycheck. They want to connect through their work to something larger than themselves. Having a purpose is essential in their lives and that's admirable.

But what is the purpose economy? Is it a serious shift disrupting industries, or is it just idealism? Aaron Hurst, the CEO of Imperative, a site that helps people connect to their purpose, has investigated the rise and impact of this phenomenon in his book The Purpose Economy.

“We’re already seeing that in the top innovations coming out of finance, education, healthcare, retail, all the top innovations are all around this need for purpose,” says Hurst. “As you look at the workplace all the changes we’re trying to make in the workplace, the things Google’s doing, the things top companies are doing, they’re all because, especially the millennial generation is demanding purpose in their work at a level never seen before. And that’s why I believe we’re in the early days of our fourth economy, a purpose economy.”

Hurst points out that the definition is still developing, but it encompasses a more localized economy and moving away from consumption to creation and experiences. For more on the purpose economy and where it’s headed, watch this clip from Big Think’s interview:

‘Time is elastic’: Why time passes faster atop a mountain than at sea level

The idea of 'absolute time' is an illusion. Physics and subjective experience reveal why.

ESA
Surprising Science
  • Since Einstein posited his theory of general relativity, we've understood that gravity has the power to warp space and time.
  • This "time dilation" effect occurs even at small levels.
  • Outside of physics, we experience distortions in how we perceive time — sometimes to a startling extent.
Keep reading Show less

The cost of world peace? It's much less than the price of war

The world's 10 most affected countries are spending up to 59% of their GDP on the effects of violence.

Mario Tama/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Conflict and violence cost the world more than $14 trillion a year.
  • That's the equivalent of $5 a day for every person on the planet.
  • Research shows that peace brings prosperity, lower inflation and more jobs.
  • Just a 2% reduction in conflict would free up as much money as the global aid budget.
  • Report urges governments to improve peacefulness, especially amid COVID-19.
Keep reading Show less

The evolution of modern rainforests began with the dinosaur-killing asteroid

The lush biodiversity of South America's rainforests is rooted in one of the most cataclysmic events that ever struck Earth.

Velociraptor Dinosaur in the Rainforest

meen_na via Adobe Stock
Surprising Science
  • One especially mysterious thing about the asteroid impact, which killed the dinosaurs, is how it transformed Earth's tropical rainforests.
  • A recent study analyzed ancient fossils collected in modern-day Colombia to determine how tropical rainforests changed after the bolide impact.
  • The results highlight how nature is able to recover from cataclysmic events, though it may take millions of years.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast