Russia Expert and NYU Global Affairs Professor Mark Galeotti Answers Your Questions About The Future of Russia

Russia Expert and NYU Global Affairs Professor Mark Galeotti Answers Your Questions About The Future of Russia

Dr. Mark Galeotti is an expert in transitional organized crime, security affairs and modern Russia. He has been researching Russian security issues since the late 1980s and he is now Clinical Professor of Global Affairs and Academic Chair of New York University's Center for Global Affairs.


Fresh from a trip to Moscow where he witnessed the Russian elections firsthand, Dr. Galeotti,  will be in our studio on Thursday, March 8 at 3pm for a live interview where he will sound off on the elections and the future of Russia.

Please submit your questions for Mark Galeotti by writing them in the comments section below, or email them to an@bigthink.com

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Photo Credit: HS2
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