Curtis Sliwa Makes a Citizen's Arrest


Guardian

Angels founder Curtis Sliwa blew through the Big Think offices this

morning, providing practical self-defense tips as well as comic relief.

Dressed in his characteristic red jacket and beret, Sliwa talked about

the complicated legality of citizen's arrests and even demonstrated how

to execute one. His Guardian Angels have been patrolling the streets of

New York City for over 30 years and now are active in over 140 cities

around the globe, yet they have never once been successfully sued after a

citizen's arrest. Sliwa talked about why crime is better now than it

was 30 years ago, but he also identified bad parenting as the root cause

of most crime. Sliwa also spoke to us about surviving a kidnapping and

shooting back in 1992, which he says was ordered by John Gotti Sr.


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