Why the Olympics have always been a better stage for politics than sport

"Sports is war minus the shooting," said George Orwell. So far, however, a thawing of tensions between North Korea and South Korea has been the big political story of the 2018 Olympic Games.

Protestors sounding off about China’s policies in the run-up to the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Credit: Getty Images.

"Sports is war minus the shooting," said George Orwell.

So far, however, a thawing of tensions between North Korea and South Korea as a result of the 2018 Olympic Games in Pyeongchang—exemplified by their marching together under a common flag during the opening ceremony—has been the big political story surrounding these Games.

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How bad an investment are the Olympic Games for host cities?

If most people knew the details, they might feel very differently about the games.

An aerial photo shows a general view of the Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium venue of the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic games, in the town of Hoenggye on October 31, 2017. (ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)

Athletes and spectators alike are ramping up for the 2018 Winter Games, this year held in PyeongChang, South Korea. Beginning February 9, these Games will be the second time the Republic of Korea will have hosted the Olympics. The first was in 1988, a sort of coming out party, where Seoul showcased how much the country had developed on the world stage.

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