How a spaceship the size of a postage-stamp could find humanity’s new home planet

Sending a tiny spaceship to the nearest habitable planet at 20% of the speed of light? No problem, says theoretical physicist Michio Kaku.

Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku doesn't just hope that humanity finds its way onto other planets... he's even picked out the ones we should be moving to — Proxima Centauri B, in the Alpha Centauri triple star system. He's even suggested that the next great space exploration could happen on a spaceship the size of a postage stamp, traveling 20% the speed of light, sent by using high-powered lasers. It sounds like a wild theory, but if anyone's wild theories could come true in the next 100 years, it's probably Michio Kaku. His latest book is The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth.

A Trip from the Sun to Jupiter at the Speed of Light. Bring a Sandwich.

Watch what it might look like to travel from the sun to Jupiter at the speed of light.

If you lived here, you’d be home by now (ALPHONSE SWINEHEART)

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1 Number Will Soon Reveal If the Speed of Light Used to Be Faster

Scientists produce a value for the cosmic microwave background that will definitely prove or disprove that the speed of light used to be higher.

Big bang (FILTER FORGE)

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Hey Bill Nye! How Will We Know When to Believe a Time Traveler?

If someone comes back from the future, they ought to have packed one thing in their carry on: proof.

Time travel is the fantasy that humans can’t stop hoping for. Our collective wish for a connection to the future or past floods into our culture through literature, film, television, music, and architecture. But what if it has already been done? What if someone has travelled back or forward and told us their story – would we believe them? Should we? One such case is John Titer, a self-declared time traveler who posted in online forums in 2000, claiming to come from the year 2036 and giving both vague and detailed predictions (which have not yet come true).

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