From 300lbs to a Navy SEAL: How to gain control of your mind and life

The countdown continues! This is the 9th most popular video of 2018 — and great fuel for starting a new year.

  • David Goggins is scary tough. He is the only person to have completed Navy SEAL training (including two Hell Weeks), Air Force tactical air controller training, and U.S. Army Ranger School.
  • Not that he was always a super soldier: Goggins once weighed 300lbs and was by his own admission lazy and undisciplined.
  • Here, Goggins explains how he transformed himself and won the war in his mind—from positive self-talk and building a 'cookie jar' of resilience, to the 40% rule, here's how you can learn to push past your own mind games.
  • You can follow David on Twitter and Instagram @davidgoggins and Facebook.
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Strengthen your mind, body, and spirit like a Navy SEAL

What are you capable of? David Goggins' amazing and grueling feat of persistence shows how tough the human mind can be.

What could almost destroy the body and mind of the only person to complete Navy SEAL training (including two Hell Weeks), Air Force tactical air controller training, and U.S. Army Ranger School? David Goggins is tough, but in an effort to raise money for the Lone Survivor Foundation, he took on a challenge that tested him more than any of his military experiences: the Badwater 135. This is an ultra-marathon event that requires participants to run 135 miles in 24 hours in the peak heat of Death Valley. Goggins wasn't a runner at the time; he was a bulky power lifter, and he only had four days to prepare for the qualifying race. He needed to run 100 miles in under 24 hours. So how did he do? Here, he tells the story and in doing so shares a lesson on human potential, mental toughness, and why you won't grow as a person if you always choose the path of least resistance. You can follow David on Twitter and Instagram @davidgoggins and Facebook.

How does meditation work?

Two meditation pioneers, Daniel Goleman and Richard J. Davidson, answer that question in their new book, Altered Traits.

People meditate during a during a mass meditation session at the DisclosureFest in Los Angeles, California on June 17, 2017. (Photo: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)
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1st Scientific Analysis of Suicide Notes Lends Insights into the Heartbreaking Act

A team of researchers analyzed 1,280 suicide notes written between 2000 and 2009 to seek a new prevention strategy. 

People from all over the US travel to the Golden Gate bridge to jump. Getty Images.

For decades, the mortality rate across the US was in decline. That’s why the results of a 2015 report were so shocking. For the first time in generations, middle-aged white people saw their death rate increase. Husband and wife economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton discovered this disturbing trend, which began back in 1999. The researchers labeled these “deaths of despair,” resulting from suicide, drug or alcohol abuse.

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