NASA: The Beating Heart of America's Innovation Industry

As its CEO, Bill Nye lays out the missions The Planetary Society would like to see NASA focus on over the next 20 years. NASA by nature goes where the future is, and Nye can't help but think of another industry that should follow suit.

Why is NASA so important? Let us count the ways – for its intellectual and physical daring, its spinoff technology that has advanced civilization generally (we wouldn’t have the internet without NASA) – but perhaps chief among them is that no matter who you are in the world or how you feel about the United States, NASA earns global respect for its technological achievement and drive towards progress and efficiency. An industry that could learn from that ethos, rather than digging its heels in to delay the future, is fossil fuels. If everyone pulled together in the same direction, it would mean clean, renewable energy for everyone on Earth, much sooner. Bill Nye's most recent book is Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World.

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Google to Purchase 100% Alternative Energy Sources in 2017

Pedal faster, we need the juice! The tech giant is about to become the world's greenest company. Here's how. 

If she pedals fast enough maybe Google can harness it... (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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Is the Land that Gave us Combustion-Engine Cars About to Be the Death of Them?

Will this EU power be the first to prove that a modern, industrialized nation can make major shifts towards cleaner, greener energy without catastrophe?

Cars and traffic fill the A100 ring highway at dusk on November 3, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

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What You Want to Know About Costa Rica’s Renewable Energy Victory

How Costa Rica achieved 100% renewable energy, and what it means.

Estanquillos, Costa Rica

There’s been a lot of excitement about Costa Rica’s recent announcement that it got 100% of its electricity from clean renewable energy sources for 76 days straight, from the end of June through August. Its total for 2016 so far is 150 days altogether. Costa Rica set a goal of becoming carbon-neutral by 2021, though they’ve recently pushed that back to 2085.

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