What Does Your Level of Moral Outrage Tell Others About You?

Outraged by something on the internet? Yawn. You may be simply falling for a very old trick... and becoming a run-of-the-mill bully in the process.

Outrage on the internet is very, very easy to find. It seems that everyday someone has done something that other people can't stand and have to say something about (pro tip: this happened before the internet, too, it's just that there's a bigger audience for it thanks to social media). People dog pile on top of the person or thing they're outraged about, get worked up about it, and move on. But what does this constant anger actually say about us? Never before in human history has it been so easy to have an anonymous avatar to hide behind, and it's created a backwards and heightened version of outrage that neuroscientist Molly Crockett finds extremely interesting.

How to cultivate patience and tame your anger

If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. But if you're a Michelin Star chef with a restaurant to run, you're going to need a better coping strategy.

If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. But if that's not an option, you're going to need a better coping strategy. For Michelin Star chef Eric Ripert, discovering the philosophy of Buddhism and meditating daily transformed him from a raging, plate-smashing chef, to a calm and collected leader. The culinary industry is trying to rectify its reputation for workplace abuse and make kitchens a more mentally healthy environment to work in. For Ripert, the teachings of Buddhism inspired him to change the way he reacted to stress and frustration—but it's really just the framework: he recommends finding the philosophy that works for you and can guide you to become a better and more accountable person. Eric Ripert's most recent book is 32 Yolks: From My Mother's Table to Working the Line

Want to Be Zen as F*Ck? Try Rage Yoga.

"Rage Yoga" is a new yoga movement that includes drinking beer, yelling out obscenities and a heavy metal soundtrack.  

While there are numerous health benefits that come with practicing yoga, it’s not for everyone.  To some, it can be slow, too quiet, and even boring. It can also be hard to distance yourself from the turbulence of everyday life and to disappear into the peaceful state yoga requires. To address this dissonance between yoga and modern life, a professional contortionist in Canada has created a new yoga movement called “Rage Yoga”. Practicing Rage Yoga includes drinking beer, yelling out obscenities, and a heavy metal soundtrack.  The mantra of the new movement - “get zen as fuck”.

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