​Why the simulation hypothesis is pseudoscience

The simulation hypothesis is fun to talk about, but believing it requires an act of faith.

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  • The simulation hypothesis posits that everything we experience was coded by an intelligent being, and we are part of that computer code.
  • But we cannot accurately reproduce natural laws with computer simulations.
  • Faith is fine, but science requires evidence and logic.
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The philosophy of bullsh*t and how to avoid stepping in it

A philosopher's guide to detecting nonsense and getting around it.

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  • A professor in Sweden has a bold on idea on what BS, pseudoscience, and pseudophilosophy actually are.
  • He suggests they are defined by a lack of "epistemic conscientiousness" rather than merely being false.
  • He offers suggestions on how to avoid producing nonsense and how to identify it on sight.
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The FDA Is Finally Taking a Stance Against High-Risk Homeopathic Products

Homeopathic manufacturers take advantage of sick and vulnerable populations in criminal ways—and the FDA is, after much absence, starting to crack down.

How a Quick Lesson About Vaccination Can Help Stop Fake News

Is misinformation causing outbreaks of diseases long thought curable? A recent study found that just a simple "heads up" about fake news can help save thousands of lives. 

An infant receives a measles vaccination in Berlin

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Hey Bill Nye! If Scientific Discoveries Are Dangerous, Should They Be Censored?

There is censorship in science, admits Bill Nye – but not nearly as much as there should be.

There are certainly some science labs and military research projects that are for classified eyes only, says Bill Nye, but in his view the more pressing issue regarding science and censorship is the proliferation of exaggerated and twisted science studies, and outright pseudoscience on the internet. It's a topic particularly relevant in the wake of heightened fake news awareness. We ordinary citizens may never crack the code of the secret projects government scientists may or may not be working on, but we can get busy educating ourselves and fine-tuning our critical thinking skills so we aren't led astray by false stories.

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