Breaching a “carbon threshold” could lead to mass extinction

Study finds that carbon dioxide emissions may trigger a reflex in the carbon cycle, with devastating consequences.

In the brain, when neurons fire off electrical signals to their neighbors, this happens through an "all-or-none" response. The signal only happens once conditions in the cell breach a certain threshold.

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An escape route for carbon

Study shows minerals sequester carbon for thousands of years, which may explain oxygen's abundance in the atmosphere.

As many of us may recall from grade school science class, the Earth's carbon cycle goes something like this: As plants take up carbon dioxide and convert it into organic carbon, they release oxygen back into the air.

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Honeybees just had a record winter die-off

2018's winter was particularly harsh on U.S. honeybees. What's causing bee populations to plummet, and what can we do about it?

Photo credit: Damien TUPINIER on Unsplash
  • Since 2006, the Bee Informed Partnership has conducted a survey on U.S. beekeepers. The most recent survey shows that the 2018 winter resulted in the biggest die-off since the survey began, with a loss of 37.7 percent.
  • This die-off is part of a larger trend. Bee populations have been falling for decades.
  • The reasons why are multifaceted and compound on one another.
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The strange genetic twist in Campbell's tomato soup

New research solves a long-standing puzzle.

Image source: Velho Junior/Shutterstock
  • Breeders found a genetic tweak that made tomatoes easier to pick, but they didn't grow as well.
  • Modern technology has revealed an ancient surprise hidden in the fruit.
  • New research showcases how much we're still learning about crop gene editing.
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How to use tea to biohack your mood, stress, and productivity

Ancient beverages such as tea and chamomile can heighten your modern-day performance.

  • Tea was cultivated in China nearly 5,000 years ago.
  • Its molecular makeup makes it the perfect biohack for regulating mood, alertness, and concentration throughout the day.
  • Tea may not be a panacea, but studies suggest promising long-term health benefits.
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