How to use tea to biohack your mood, stress, and productivity

Ancient beverages like tea and chamomile can heighten your modern-day performance.

  • Tea was cultivated in China nearly 5,000 years ago.
  • Its molecular makeup makes it the perfect biohack for regulating mood, alertness, and concentration throughout the day.
  • Tea may not be a panacea, but studies suggest promising long-term health benefits.
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Scientists create genetically-modified houseplant that removes carcinogens from air

A new genetically-modified pothos ivy plant is exceptionally skilled at removing dangerous pollutants, such as benzene and chloroform, from the surrounding air.

Photo credit: Juliane Mergener on Unsplash
  • Houseplants are rumored to be natural air purifiers, but most research suggests their benefits are only marginal.
  • Genetically-modified plants might change that because they're able to produce special proteins that absorb and break down particular compounds.
  • The results of the recent research show promise for future applications of the technique.
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We can assess the health of coral reefs by the sounds algae make

Tiny bubbles talk photosynthesis.

(Freeman, et al)
  • During photosynthesis, algae produces a symphony of little "pings."
  • The sounds are produced by oxygen bubbles breaking away from the plants.
  • Monitoring reef health through its sound is a new avenue for acoustic ecology.
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The first list of antidepressant foods restructures the "standard" American diet

The first list of antidepressant food scores restructures the "standard" American diet.

  • Leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and oysters top the list of depression-fighting foods.
  • Organ meats are also near the top of nutrient-dense food sources that should be included in your diet.
  • Researchers focus more on what to eat rather than what to remove from the standard diet.
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A.I. turns 57 million crop fields into stunning abstract art

Detailed (and beautiful) information on 57 million crop fields across the U.S. and Europe are now available online.

Image: OneSoil
  • Using satellite images and artificial intelligence, OneSoil wants to make 'precision farming' available to the world.
  • The start-up from Belarus has already processed the U.S. and Europe, and aims for global coverage by 2020.
  • The map is practical, and more — browse 'Random Beautiful Fields' at the touch of a button.
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