We can assess the health of coral reefs by the sounds algae make

Tiny bubbles talk photosynthesis.

(Freeman, et al)
  • During photosynthesis, algae produces a symphony of little "pings."
  • The sounds are produced by oxygen bubbles breaking away from the plants.
  • Monitoring reef health through its sound is a new avenue for acoustic ecology.
Keep reading Show less

The first list of antidepressant foods restructures the "standard" American diet

The first list of antidepressant food scores restructures the "standard" American diet.

  • Leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and oysters top the list of depression-fighting foods.
  • Organ meats are also near the top of nutrient-dense food sources that should be included in your diet.
  • Researchers focus more on what to eat rather than what to remove from the standard diet.
Keep reading Show less

A.I. turns 57 million crop fields into stunning abstract art

Detailed (and beautiful) information on 57 million crop fields across the U.S. and Europe are now available online.

Image: OneSoil
  • Using satellite images and artificial intelligence, OneSoil wants to make 'precision farming' available to the world.
  • The start-up from Belarus has already processed the U.S. and Europe, and aims for global coverage by 2020.
  • The map is practical, and more — browse 'Random Beautiful Fields' at the touch of a button.
Keep reading Show less

Google and NatGeo team up to combat climate change

They're creating an unprecedented map of Earth to help government leaders make better decisions in regard to climate change.

(National Geographic/Google/Big Think)
  • A recently proposed campaign among scientists aims to protect 30 percent of Earth's land and oceans by 2030.
  • In light of this, National Geographic and Google announce an unprecedented mapping project to help government leaders make better decisions in regard to climate change, and to meet the 2030 targets.
  • The Wyss Campaign for Nature Foundation is pledging $1 billion to help meet the 2030 targets.
Keep reading Show less

Microdosing magic truffles makes you more creative, new study finds

Is microdosing magic truffles a way to unlock your creative potential? That's long been anecdotal, but the evidence is coming.

  • A recent study showed that microdosing magic truffles can significantly increase one's creative thinking.
  • Published in Psychopharmacology, the study joins a growing body of research showing the potential benefits of low-dose psychedelics.
  • While this research comes with limitations, it could open up many avenues to improve anxiety and work conditions in society.
Keep reading Show less