Gamma-ray space telescope study may have spotted dark matter

New study of gamma rays and gravitational lensing points to the possible presence of dark matter.

NASA
  • Analyzing data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, researchers find hints of dark matter.
  • The scientists looked to spot a correlation between gravitational lensing and gamma rays.
  • Future release of data can pinpoint whether the dark matter is really responsible for observed effects.
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The long, wild story of the universe, in 5 eras

Astronomers find these five chapters to be a handy way of conceiving the universe's incredibly long lifespan.

Image source: Ryan Hutton/unsplash
  • We're in the middle, or thereabouts, of the universe's Stelliferous era.
  • If you think there's a lot going on out there now, the first era's drama makes things these days look pretty calm.
  • Scientists attempt to understand the past and present by bringing together the last couple of centuries' major schools of thought.
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New nuclear fusion reactor design may be a breakthrough

Using permanent magnets may help to make nuclear fusion reactors simpler and more affordable.

Credit: C. Zhu/PPPL
  • Nuclear fusion is the process of fusing atomic nuclei, which can unleash vast amounts of energy.
  • Nuclear fusion reactors have existed for years, but none of them are able to sustainably produce energy.
  • A new paper describes how permanent magnets can be used on stellarators to control the flow of super-hot plasma.

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Photo by Kevin Fleming/Corbis via Getty Images
  • Robert Oppenheimer wrote a telling letter of recommendation for Richard Feynman in 1943.
  • After praising Feynman's intellectual prowess, Oppenheimer used most of the ink discussing the strength of his character.
  • The letter is a stark reminder of the importance of emotional intelligence.
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Physicists probe why the Universe exists and has matter

A new study rocks prevailing theories on antimatter in the early Universe.

NASA
  • Scientists from around the world teamed up to study the properties of neutrons.
  • They were able to achieve extremely precise measurements of electric compasses in neutrons.
  • The results challenge current theories of why antimatter and matter didn't destroy each other in the early Universe.
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