How Spotify manipulates your emotions and sells your data

A new book on the music distribution service claims it is.

Spotify logo on an android mobile phone. (Photo by Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
  • Spotify Teardown claims that the streaming service is sending (and receiving) much more than music.
  • The authors contend that the service is engaged in emotional manipulation given their playlist emphasis.
  • Music is only the surface layer of a much larger data collection and advertising infrastructure.
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In 1999, David Bowie knew the internet would change the world

Musican. Actor. Fashion Icon. Internet Visionary?

  • David Bowie was well known as a rock star, but somehow his other interests and accomplishments remain obscure.
  • In this 1999 interview, he explains why he knows the internet is more than just a tool and why it was destined to change the world.
  • He launched his own internet service provider in 1998, BowieNet. It ceased operations in 2006.
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'Disturbing' music influences us to take fewer financial risks, Israeli researchers find

Want to make safer investments? Pay attention to the music playing in the background.

Photo credit: Theo Wargo / Getty Images for Firefly
  • A recent study examined the different ways fast/arousing and slow/calming music affects the ways people make financial decisions.
  • The results show that people made safer investments while listening to fast/arousing music, a finding that might be explained by the fact that people tend to be more risk averse when their working memory becomes overloaded.
  • Although everyone experiences music differently, it's worth keeping in mind that subtle situational factors can influence the ways we make important decisions.
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3 things you already have in your house that are good for your mental health

You can incorporate these science-backed activities into your evening routine tonight.

Photo by bruce mars on Unsplash

It's getting dark earlier now, as we head towards the crisp snap of November air. Days at work, as a result, can feel longer: You're leaving the office and it's already nearly nighttime. Those who suffer from seasonal affective disorder begin to experience the effects during the fall, according to the Mayo Clinic. And even if you don't have SAD, it's easy to feel overwhelmed and stressed this time of year, as we begin to think about the holidays ahead. Luckily, science shows us that there are things we can do right in our own homes to increase our happiness and well-being.

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Musical training improves vision, researchers say

Over 67,000 trials by the Color Guard can't be wrong.

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND - NOVEMBER 11: Drummers march during a Sunset Ceremony at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park on November 11, 2018 in Wellington, New Zealand. Armistice Day 2018 marks the centenary anniversary of the Armistice that ended the First World War. (Photo by Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images)
  • Drummers and brass players have stronger visual timing sensitivity than flag spinners in the Color Guard.
  • The three groups took part in over 67,000 temporal order judgment (TOJ) trials.
  • The finding, while counterintuitive, fits into the complex nature of sensory perception.
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