Understanding the Complex Relationship Between Money and Happiness

Do you really need a lot of stuff to be happy? Science says that the opposite is true.

Rapper Notorious B.I.G. perhaps put it best... "the mo' money you make, the mo' problems you get." While most of us aren't hip-hop demigods, we all have experience spending money on things that we think in the moment will make us happy but end up being... just stuff. Because when people accumulate wealth, they tend to spend it on themselves. This might make you temporarily happy but it largely means that you spend more time alone with the things that you've bought. But Harvard Professor (and Harvard’s Behavioral Insights Group member) Michael Norton has found that the more people spend on other people or in an experiential way—be it a concert ticket or simply taking a friend out for lunch—the happier they are overall. Michael's has co-written a book that covers this and other subjects called Happy Money: The Science of Happier Spending. Professor Norton’s studies are cited in The Influential Mind: What the Brain Reveals About Our Power to Change Others by Tali Sharot.

How to Master Simplicity in Design, Business and Life

Turns out simplicity is really, really complicated. Having worked with Steve Jobs for years as an advertising creative director on Apple products, Ken Segall has taken a blood oath to uphold the principles of simplicity.

Have you ever wondered why your iPhone has an ‘i’ at the front? The iPod, the iMac, iPad, iTunes? Allow us to introduce you to Ken Segall, a veteran creative director and manager of Apple’s ‘Think Different’ campaign, who worked with Steve Jobs for 14 years.

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How Little Can You Own and Still Be Really Happy?

Around the world, people are embracing minimalism as a lifestyle, focusing less on owning things.

How to live a happy life? This question has been pondered by the billions of people that came before us and very likely will be the root of human existential concern going forward. If you live in a Western society, like America, you might think that happiness is defined by the objects around you. It can be your house, your Xbox, your iPhone, your car, or the millions of products you can buy in a local supermarket for your eating pleasures. All around us are things we want or at least we are told we should want them, courtesy of the ubiquitous advertising that blankets our every waking step.

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