The secret life of maladaptive daydreaming

Daydreaming can be a pleasant pastime, but people who suffer from maladaptive daydreaming are trapped by their fantasies.

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  • Maladaptive daydreamers can experience intricate, vivid daydreams for hours a day.
  • This addiction can result in disassociation from vital life tasks and relationships.
  • Psychologists, online communities, and social pipelines are spreading awareness and hope for many.
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    A psychiatric diagnosis can be more than an unkind ‘label’

    A popular and longstanding wave of thought in psychology and psychotherapy is that diagnosis is not relevant for practitioners in those fields.

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    When I was training as a clinical psychologist, I had a rotation in a low-cost psychotherapy clinic.
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    10 things you may not know about anxiety

    Cold hands and feet? Maybe it's your anxiety.

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    • When we feel anxious, the brain's fight or flight instinct kicks in, and the blood flow is redirected from your extremities towards the torso and vital organs.
    • According to the CDC, 7.1% of children between the ages of 3-17 (approximately 4.4 million) have an anxiety diagnosis.
    • Anxiety disorders will impact 31% of Americans at some point in their lives.
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    Why some people think they hear the voices of the dead

    A new study looks at why mysterious voices are sometimes taken as spirits and other times as symptoms of mental health issues.

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    • Both spiritualist mediums and schizophrenics hear voices.
    • For the former, this constitutes a gift; for the latter, mental illness.
    • A study explores what the two phenomena have in common.
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    This is your brain on political arguments

    Debating is cognitively taxing but also important for the health of a democracy—provided it's face-to-face.

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    • New research at Yale identifies the brain regions that are affected when you're in disagreeable conversations.
    • Talking with someone you agree with harmonizes brain regions and is less energetically taxing.
    • The research involves face-to-face dialogues, not conversations on social media.
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