Do these 3 things to be a stronger manager

Creating a healthy, cohesive work environment leads to better productivity.

  • One of the main responsibilities a manager has is to create an environment where employees can be more productive.
  • The quality of work increases when people feel like they are a part of a team working towards a goal bigger than themselves.
  • Three tips for creating that kind of work culture are learning to delegate, understanding the jobs of the people you manage, and connecting with as many employees on a one-on-one basis as possible.

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Are you distracted at work? Don’t blame technology.

Distraction at work is a symptom of cultural dysfunction, not a symptom of technology, as many people claim.

  • After hearing so many people blame email and Slack as causes of distraction in the workplace, Nir Eyal went to the Slack offices and discovered it to be a focus-driven office with excellent work-life boundaries. Tech isn't the problem, he concluded. The root cause of workplace distraction is cultural dysfunction.
  • Companies that have a healthy workplace culture create psychological safety for their employees to voice concerns and complaints. When issues can be resolved—without fear of punishment—employees are able to return to work rather than sit and seethe.
  • Importantly, leaders must also model indistractibility by giving undivided attention to people in meetings and not working 24/7, which Eyal describes as a "terrible" cycle of reaction. Reacting to emails and meetings all day long doesn't give people the time to be reflective—to focus and do their best work.
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What Shark Tank investor Daymond John looks for in a business pitch

It takes more than a good idea to land a shark as a business partner.

  • As a successful entrepreneur, investor, and one of the stars of 'Shark Tank,' Daymond John is used to being pitched business ideas. In this interview, he shares what separates bad pitches from great pitches.
  • Beyond the idea, how well (or not) he and potential business partners will work together is a big factor.
  • Proof that the person did their research and some of the legwork before hand also goes a long way.

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How to activate the ‘seeking system’ of your brain

Play and experimentation are the keys to creativity and innovation.

  • There is a part of the brain called the ventral striatum, aka the "seeking system," that drives humans to explore and learn new things. When activated, the system releases dopamine and makes us feel good.
  • There are three main ways that leaders can stimulate the ventral striatums of their team: through experimentation, by finding ways to learn and play to individual strengths, and by making the purpose of the work personal.
  • As some major companies have learned, being playful and curious is a pathway to boosted creativity and innovation.

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Working for Harvey Weinstein was a 'brutal experience'

In 1998, former New Yorker editor Tina Brown went into business with Harvey Weinstein. That was a colossal mistake.

  • Tina Brown was never sexually harassed by Harvey Weinstein, however in 1998, she began a business partnership with Weinstein founding a new magazine following her success rebooting The New Yorker.
  • She describes the experience as a "colossal mistake" and Weinstein as a brutal bully who abused and humiliated his staff and left Brown shell-shocked. The venture was dropped, and Brown's regret is that she didn't pull the plug as soon as she learned what Weinstein was like behind closed doors.
  • Before you get into business with anyone, get to know who they are, advises Brown. Make phone calls to people who have worked with them in the past, and draw a line in the sand so you do not become roped into a bully's world.
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