Need a philosophical pick me up? Why one French philosopher suggests a walk.

Think walking is void of philosophy? Nietzsche and Gros are here to say you're wrong.

People walk beside the Han river in Seoul. While this isn't quite what Gros has in mind, it is a start. (Photo by Ed JONES / AFP) (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
  • French philosopher Frederic Gros tells us that walking is a route to entirely being ourselves and experiencing the sublime.
  • He has a bias towards the wondering hikes of Nietzsche and Kerouac but has a place for urban strollers too.
  • His book reminds us that even something as mundane as walking can be a vital part of our lives when done for itself.
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