Scientists use 'acoustic tweezers' to move particles in Petri dishes hands-free

New prototype Petri dishes let ordinary scientists in on the advanced technology.

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  • Acoustic tweezers allow bioparticles and cells to be precisely manipulated without touching them.
  • Sound waves grab and move very tiny objects as desired.
  • Previously available only in expensive and complex devices, acoustic tweezers have now been built into Petri dishes.
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Yes, websites really are starting to look more similar

Was the hamburger menu always so ubiquitous?

David McNew/Getty Images

Over the past few years, articles and blog posts have started to ask some version of the same question: “Why are all websites starting to look the same?"

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As the inventor of copy and paste dies, here are other computing innovations we take for granted

He's also credited by some as having coined the phrase "user-friendly."

Photo by Lorenzo Herrera on Unsplash

Larry Tesler invented cut and paste, and coined the phrase "user-friendly".

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Social media makes breakups worse, study says

Is there a way for more human-centered algorithms to prevent potentially triggering interactions on social media?

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  • According to a 2017 study, 71% of people reported feeling better (rediscovery of self and positive emotions) about 11 weeks after a breakup. But social media complicates this healing process.
  • Even if you "unfriend", block, or unfollow, social media algorithms can create upsetting encounters with your ex-partner or reminders of the relationship that once was.
  • Researchers at University of Colorado Boulder suggest that a "human-centered approach" to creating algorithms can help the system better understand the complex social interactions we have with people online and prevent potentially upsetting encounters.
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Sign of the times: Can hugging machines solve the touch crisis?

As the American loneliness epidemic reaches alarming new heights, one artist theorizes on what connection might look like in the future.

Photography: Scottie Cameron
  • The Compression Carpet is a machine created by Los Angeles-based artist Lucy McRae that simulates a hug to a person craving intimacy.
  • Research indicates that nearly half of Americans lack daily meaningful interpersonal interactions with a friend or family member. This loneliness epidemic is accompanied by a touch crisis.
  • McRae's art and neuroscience suggest that it is affectionate touch that we are deprived of in our increasingly touch-phobic society. New sensory technology seeks to solve this problem.
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