How skepticism can fight radicalism, conspiracy theorists, and Holocaust deniers

Why have some conspiracy theories been pushed back into the public? Because when you try to force them out of the mainstream, they'll find a wider audience on the fringes.

Liberal college students have taken to shouting down certain right-leaning speakers on campus that they don't agree with. Michael Shermer, the publisher of Skeptic Magazine, thinks that is the worst thing you can do. He posits that all you do when you prevent someone from speaking is make certain people want to hear them more. This has led to the rise of the conspiracy theorists and why fringe ideas—from something as silly as flat-earth believers to something as morally reprehensible as Nazism and Holocaust deniers—have been pushed back into the mainstream. Michael's new book is Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality, and Utopia.

Sean Spicer's Hitler Flub Proves Godwin's Law Is True Even Offline

A classic law of Internet debate explains why bringing up Hitler is a terrible idea as White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer found out in a disastrous press conference.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer pauses while speaking during a briefing at the White House April 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo credit: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

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10 Most Dangerous Scientific Experiments in History

The times in history when science was deadly and dangerous.

A masked ecologist militant is pictured with a barrel falsely contaminated during a demonstration against nuclear energy near the Tricastin nuclear power plant run by Areva in Bollene, southern France, on November 25, 2011, during a visit of France's Pres

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Is Donald Trump Democracy at Work? What One Nobel Laureate Thinks

Nobel Laureate and Columbia professor Dr Eric Kandel discusses the nature of good and evil via the Trump candidacy, and his own devastating childhood experiences in Austria.

Eric Kandel fled from Vienna in 1939, when he was 9 years old. The Nobel-Prize winning neuropsychiatrist and Columbia professor recently told the story on Think Again (a Big Think podcast), saying:

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