Gene-edited babies may live shorter lives, analysis finds

Chinese scientist He Jiankui edited the genes of two babies to be resistant to HIV, provoking outrage. Now, a new genetic analysis shows why this was reckless.

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  • The gene-editing technique CRISPR offers major benefits to humanity, but scientists don't believe the field is mature enough for widespread editing.
  • For this reason, when Chinese scientist He Jiankui edited the genes of two babies to be resistant to HIV, his work provoked outrage.
  • A new study of 400,000 genetic profiles reveals that He's genetic editing did indeed have an unintended consequence.
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The "Düsseldorf patient": A third person may also be in HIV remission

Recently, "the London patient" became the second person in history to be cured of HIV. Now, "the Düsseldorf patient" appears to be the third, with the possibility of more on the way.

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  • Timothy Brown became the first person to be cured of HIV in 2007.
  • Recently, it's been reported that a patient known as "the London patient" has also lost any trace of the HIV virus in their system.
  • Now, a third patient appears to be in HIV remission known as "the Düsseldorf patient."
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For second time ever a patient has been cured of HIV, scientists report

The promising news comes 12 years after the "Berlin patient" became the world's first person to be cured of the deadly virus.

HIV infected cell (Getty Images/luismmolina)
  • The New York Times reports that a team of scientists plan to announce tomorrow that a patient in London has been effectively cured of HIV.
  • The cure reportedly was the result of a bone-marrow transplant that came with a genetic mutation that naturally blocks HIV from spreading throughout the body.
  • This approach isn't quite practical to implement on a large scale, but the knowledge gained from it will likely help scientists develop more scalable approaches.
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First gene-edited babies born in China, scientist claims

A Chinese researcher has sparked controversy after claiming to have used gene-editing technology known as CRISPR to help make the world's first genetically modified babies.

(Photo: ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
  • The claim is unsubstantiated as of yet, but if true it would mark a historic moment in science and ethics.
  • The scientist claims to have edited a gene that controls whether someone can contract HIV.
  • Many say gene-editing is unethical, or that its technology is too premature to be used responsibly.
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New drug capsule may allow weekly HIV treatment

This new pill could make it easier for people to stick to the treatment. 

Indian social activists and children release ribbons and balloons during an event to mark World AIDS Day in Kolkata on December 1, 2014. (Photo credit: DIBYANGSHU SARKAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Replacing daily pills with a weekly regimen could help patients stick to their dosing schedule.

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