Need more meaning in your life? A new study suggests more sex might do the trick

Can't find meaning in your life? A new study has the next best thing. 

(FRANTISEK CZANNER)

The search for meaning in our lives is one of the great driving forces of human history. Viktor Frankl based his psychology on that search. Existentialism is based mainly on the need for meaning.  As anybody who has had an existential crisis or three knows, not having meaning in your life can cause anxiety, dread, fear, and loathing.

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10 schools of philosophy and why you should know them

There are many famous schools of thought that you have probably heard of, but did you hear the truth or just get a caricature of the idea? 

For your reading pleasure, here are ten schools of philosophy you should know about. Some of them are commonly misunderstood, and we correct that problem here.

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Three kinds of happiness, and how to achieve them

The question isn't "are you happy"... but rather "what kind of happy are you"? 

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Quick question, are you happy? If you need more than two seconds to answer it, I can wait. For many people, happiness is the end all meaning of life; that rare and beautiful thing that they long for more than anything. If you can’t answer that you are happy, don’t worry; you’re in good, if glum, company.

But maybe the question would be easier if we asked: what kind of “happy” are you?

When people talk about “happiness”, there can be more than a few things we are really talking about. The most common understanding of it is “feeling good”. This relates to hedonistic happiness and the seeking of pleasure while avoiding pain. It is a common approach to happiness, one which has been enshrined in the philosophy of Utilitarianism. It is not, however, the only way to be happy.

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Humans don't want happiness above all, argued Nietzsche

The philosopher believed we craved for something less pleasant.

Nietzsche, towards the end of his not entirely happy life.
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Would You Enter the Perfect Matrix? Why One Philosopher Says You Wouldn't.

Everybody wants to be happy, right? Who wouldn't try to get as many pleasurable experiences as they could? Well, if this philosopher is right. You wouldn't. 

Can people living in a simulated reality, even a perfect one, be said to have a "good life"?

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