Treatable brain inflammation may be behind tinnitus

Scientists may have seen a way to cure a maddening symptom of hearing loss.

Image source: Alex Iby/Unsplash/Big Think
  • A treatment for tinnitus – a constant ringing in the ears – has been frustratingly elusive.
  • Out-of-control inflammation, the brain's response to damage, may be the cause of long-term ringing in the ears.
  • A study that examined mice with noise-induced hearing loss seems to have found the neural trigger for tinnitus.
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In a world first, scientists grow new ears for children with microtia

In a landmark study for the tissue engineering community, scientists have successfully grown and reconstructed new ears for children born with a birth defect.

Photo from study, patient's face blurred to protect identity

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Learn to listen for what people mean, not just what they say

Without sounding like internet hyperbole, this super-simple listening trick can help you better understand people's intentions. And provide a fascinating insight into the minds of others.

People like to talk. And when they talk, they often muddy the water about what they really mean because people tend to speak through an autobiographical lens, i.e., "this is my truth because it is from my perspective". Todd Davis, the Chief People Officer at Franklin Covey, has spent much of his career looking for the meaning in what people are saying, and has developed a way to better understand what people are really talking about. That technique is a small adaption to a basic skill that many people forget to do when they talk: listening, and then asking questions based on finding the truth in their perspective. Just doing that (Todd explains the practice in the video much better than I do here - Ed.) can make a world of difference in interpersonal interaction. Todd's latest book is Get Better: 15 Proven Practices to Build Effective Relationships at Work.

Humans Have Regenerative Abilities—Scientists Just Need to Turn Them On

It's somewhat of a given that over the course of your life, you'll lose your hearing to some degree. But that doesn't necessarily have to be the case.

It's somewhat of a given that over the course of your life, you'll lose your hearing to some degree. But that doesn't necessarily have to be the case. Your intestine can re-create itself every five days or so, and there's a science there that can (hopefully) be applied to other parts of the body. Chris Loose is a Hertz Foundation Fellow, working amongst a group of fellows and researchers who are looking at regenerative tissue and making it a reality not just for your hearing but perhaps for other parts of the body as well. We could be in for a regenerative future—and perhaps one where we can live to be well over 100 and still look like we're 22. The Hertz Foundation mission is to provide unique financial and fellowship support to the nation's most remarkable PhD students in the hard sciences. Hertz Fellowships are among the most prestigious in the world, and the foundation has invested over $200 million in Hertz Fellows since 1963 (present value) and supported over 1,100 brilliant and creative young scientists, who have gone on to become Nobel laureates, high-ranking military personnel, astronauts, inventors, Silicon Valley leaders, and tenured university professors. For more information, visit hertzfoundation.org.

Why Are So Many Musical Geniuses Asocial? A New Study Reveals an Interesting Link

Musical savants have “enhanced pitch discrimination” and “increased auditory perceptual capacity.” But why?

Do those with autism experience music as a richer experience? Getty Images.

We often see in the media autistic savants who can write and play music like grand masters with incredible talent and flourish. In fact, of autistic savants and savants in general, having extraordinary musical talent is one of the most common advantages. A new study published in the journal Cognition, suggests a reason for it. Those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have superior hearing. 

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