Healthcare should be a basic human right in America, says Ban Ki-moon

Ban Ki-moon recently criticized the state of the U.S. healthcare system as part of his work with The Elders, an international organization founded by Nelson Mandela.

Ban Ki-moon, former United Nations Secretary General. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
  • Ki-moon served as secretary general for the United Nations from 2007 to the end of 2016.
  • He said special interests are blocking the American government from pursuing universal healthcare.
  • 30 million Americans are not covered by insurance. A 2018 poll shows that more than half of Americans would support a single-payer healthcare plan.
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Politics & Current Affairs

What’s your commitment? How to become an effective change-maker.

Having a goal to change the world for the better is great. But what's more important, says Chelsea Clinton, is having a plan to make it happen.

As an activist, public health professor, mom, author, and Vice Chair of the Clinton Foundation, Chelsea Clinton sure is pretty busy. Here, she explains to us that there is a divide between wanting to make the world a better place and actually having a direction and a unique goal to make it happen. In order to help others both see and meet their goals, the Clinton Foundation launched Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) to give mentorship to those looking to make positive change. This video, part one in a series, is a great introduction to CGI U and to Chelsea's overall worldview. You can find out more about CGI U right here.

Politics & Current Affairs

Jeff Bezos, Jamie Dimon, and Warren Buffett unite to disrupt healthcare's profit motive

The three behemoth companies are teaming up to disrupt the U.S. health care industry, a move that spooked the markets on the morning of the announcement.

Jeff Bezos, Amazon; Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan; Warren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway (Getty)

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Politics & Current Affairs

How to win a negotiation? Decode the subtext of people’s demands

Haggling over a number? That's a terrible way for people to negotiate, says Harvard International Negotiation Project head honcho Dan Shapiro.

Negotiation is part of life. Whether we're talking about something as grandiose as healthcare or as personal as buying a car, we often spend the vast majority of the negotiation process haggling over the numbers. This is often a bad way to look at it, says Dan Shapiro. And he should know: he's head of the Harvard International Negotiation Project and knows an awful lot about getting two opposing sides to see eye to eye. So what's the best way to do so? Perhaps talking about why each party wants what they want and negotiating from there. When polarized debates come to a head over "use vs them" mentalities, looking at it from this angle—i.e. the nuts and bolts of a position and less so the end result—can humanize each side to the other. Dan Shapiro's latest book is Negotiating the Nonnegotiable: How to Resolve Your Most Emotionally Charged Conflicts.

Videos

Study: More Americans Than Ever Have Serious Mental Illnesses but Fewer Can Get Help

A study finds an increasing number of Americans live with serious mental issues and their access to healthcare is getting worse.

Credit: Pixabay.

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Mind & Brain