Study: Your Eyes Are Drawn to What’s Meaningful, Not to What “Sticks Out”

A new study overturns the conventional thinking about how we focus our visual attention.

Images from a UC Davis eye-tracking study.

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You're Not Fast Enough to Swat a Fly—Here's Why

Flies are in no way smart, but they experience time in an almost Matrix-like way. 

Still from AMC's "Breaking Bad"

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This Science Team Wants You to Never Have to Buy Another Pair of Glasses

These glycerin "smart glasses" may be the only specs you'll need – although they do need a design intervention at some point.

Sometimes, wearing eyeglasses can be a pain. You need to change them with every new prescription and in addition they don't always serve you well enough. Reading glasses, for example, help you focus up close but become useless if you need to go back to doing other activities. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology more than 150 million Americans use some type of corrective eyewear, spending $15 billion each year. We may all need glasses at some point, because as a natural side-effect of aging, the lens inside our eyes that adjusts the focal depth depending on what we look at, loses its ability to change focus.

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