• Climate change is no longer a financial problem, just a political one.
  • Mitigating climate change by decarbonizing our economy would add trillions of dollars in new investments.
  • Public attitudes toward climate change have shifted steadily in favor of action. Now it's up to elected leaders.


Videos

Why Lil Dicky made this star-studded Earth Day music video

"Earth" features about 30 of the biggest names in entertainment.

  • Lil Dicky is a rapper and comedian who released his debut album in 2015.
  • His new music video, "Earth," features artists such as Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, Ed Sheehan, Kevin Hart, and Leonardo DiCaprio.
  • All proceeds of the music video will go to environmental causes, Dicky said.
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Culture & Religion

How to cut food waste: Turn unused food into take-home meals for hungry kids

That's the strategy behind a program being tested in one Indiana school district.

Image source: FLICKR.COM / USDAGOV
  • An Indiana school district recently partnered with a nonprofit to send some students home with a set of frozen meals on weekends.
  • In the U.S., about 12 percent of households with children will experience food insecurity at some point during the year.
  • The U.S. wastes a massive amount of food. Programs like this might be a first step in cutting back on waste.
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Politics & Current Affairs

Why a beefless Burger King Whopper is cause for excitement

Beefless meat enters the mainstream.

The new BK Impossible Whopper is on the left. Image source: CNET
  • Burger King is testing its first major foray into the field of beefless patties.
  • On top of plant-based meats, cellular agriculture — or "cell-ag" — can also yield animal-free patties.
  • A new report lists 90 reasons that cell-ag holds a lot of promise.
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Technology & Innovation

Why the ocean you know and love won’t exist in 50 years

Can sensitive coral reefs survive another human generation?

  • Coral reefs may not be able to survive another human decade because of the environmental stress we have placed on them, says author David Wallace-Wells. He posits that without meaningful changes to policies, the trend of them dying out, even in light of recent advances, will continue.
  • The World Wildlife Fund says that 60 percent of all vertebrate mammals have died since just 1970. On top of this, recent studies suggest that insect populations may have fallen by as much as 75 percent over the last few decades.
  • If it were not for our oceans, the planet would probably be already several degrees warmer than it is today due to the emissions we've expelled into the atmosphere.
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Videos