Why America’s Christian foundation is a myth

A new book by constitutional attorney Andrew Seidel takes on Christian nationalism.

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  • A new book by attorney Andrew Seidel, 'The Founding Myth: Why Christian nationalism Is Un-American', takes on the myth of America's Christian founding.
  • Christian nationalism is the belief that the United States was founded as a Christian nation on Christian principles, and that the nation has strayed from that original foundation.
  • Judeo-Christian principles are fundamentally opposed to the principles on which America was built, argues Seidel.
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Student of the stars: How do you become an astronomer?

NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller explains what astronomers actually do, and how can you become one.

  • What's the difference between an astronomer and an astrophysicist? NASA's Michelle Thaller explains that these terms are used interchangeably: both are physicists who study objects and phenomena in the sky.
  • How can you become an astronomer? There is a defined path to take: Do an undergrad degree in astrophysics, physics, mathematics or computer science, then complete a doctorate in astrophysics. You could also work with astronomers by studying engineering and building telescopes.
  • In this fascinating explanation of what an astronomer's day-to-day job actually looks like, Thaller shines a light on the unexpected skills you might need and answers the question on every ambitious astronomer-to-be's mind: How will I know what to discover?

Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education?

When measuring for the future, there is much to consider.

  • We need to embrace a plethora of schooling options as necessary to help different types of learners get to success.
  • On top of testing for literacy and math competence, we should also test for other things that are clearly important to parents, such as whether kids feel safe and cared for. These things are softer but more difficult to assess.
  • To improve our education system, we need to understand we currently only have answers to some huge open questions right now. We are still figuring things out on how to enrich different people's lives as they find their positions in the economy — and society at large.
  • This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
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How can we best help students? Cultivate their love for learning.

So much has changed since 1893. Why not the education system?

  • In 1893, a committee of ten leaders in education chaired by Charles Eliot, the president of Harvard University, produced a report that aimed to unify the various education systems and philosophies across America, with the goal of giving the same education to everyone.
  • That framework is still operating in the U.S. today—but should it be? John Hardin, vice president of Stand Together Ventures, points out that this uniform approach does not take into account the unique interests and skills of each kid. It might even squash children's love of learning, rather than cultivating it.
  • This video is supported by yes. every kid., an initiative that aims to rethink education from the ground up by connecting innovators in a shared mission to conquer "one size fits all" education reform.
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Redefining the “experts” in education reform might be the key to success

Can we radically shift our perception of who should be enacting real change in K-12 education?

  • The right kind of education reform will happen with people instead of to people.
  • Part of this requires redefining who the "experts" are in education. It might be beneficial to loosen control on the part of those that train principals and teachers.
  • If educators can view themselves as hosts to the conversation of what schools could look like, the movement for change becomes more courageous.
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