Want students to cheat less? Science says treat them justly

Students who think the world is just cheat less, but they need to experience justice to feel that way.

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  • Students in German and Turkish universities who believed the world is just cheated less than their pessimistic peers.
  • The tendency to think the world is just is related to the occurence of experiences of justice.
  • The findings may prove useful in helping students adjust to college life.
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Survey: Half of U.S. job seekers on the hunt because of coronavirus

The survey, performed by Morning Consult and commissioned by Amazon, found a majority of those job seekers want to move into new industries to stay relevant.

  • As of August 2020, United States' unemployment rate remains at 8.4 percent, more than double February 2020's numbers.
  • A new survey, commissioned by Amazon, found that roughly half of today's job seekers are looking as a result of coronavirus.
  • Amazon released survey highlights in advance of its Career Day event, where it will seek to fill some of its 33,000 open corporate and tech positions.
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    New research suggests a possible treatment for dyslexia​

    The neurodevelopmental disorder has long baffled researchers.

    • Dyslexia affects up to 10 percent of the world's population.
    • Though first identified in 1881, no cause has ever been discovered.
    • A new study at the University of Geneva found positive results using transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS).
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    Education innovation: Our window of opportunity is here

    Technology is an important tool, but it will take an ecosystem of educators, students, and caregivers to make the most of it.

    • The old adage that it "takes a village" has proven true for education in the time of coronavirus. What constitutes a "school" and who is considered an "educator" has changed out of necessity, but important opportunities for the future have come from these unexpected circumstances as communities have and continue to adapt.
    • "The greatest human superpower is empathy," says Kaya Henderson, "the ability to deeply connect with other people and to see yourself in them and to see them in you." She argues that "a part of the reason why we are so divided in this world today is because we see people as 'other' and we don't see them as extensions of ourselves."
    • While technology has become a big part of the education landscape, community is still the keystone. "I want technology to amplify and to scale excellence," Henderson says. "To amplify knowledge and to scale excellence all at the same time while paying deep attention to the human connections that are integral to education."
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    Equity made Estonia an educational front runner

    Estonia has combined a belief in learning with equal-access technology to create one of world's best education systems.

    • Estonia became a top performer in the most recent PISA, a worldwide study of 15-year-old students' capabilities in math, reading, and science.
    • PISA data showed that Estonia has done remarkably well in reducing the gap between a student's socioeconomic background and their access to quality education.
    • The country's push toward providing equal-access to learning technology is a modern example of the culture's dedication to equity in education.
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