Giving octopuses ecstasy reveals surprising link to humans

A groundbreaking new study shows that octopuses seemed to exhibit uncharacteristically social behavior when given MDMA, the psychedelic drug commonly known as ecstasy.

Image: damn_unique via Flickr
  • Octopuses, like humans, have genes that seem to code for serotonin transporters.
  • Scientists gave MDMA to octopuses to see whether those genes translated into a binding site for serotonin, which regulates emotions and behavior in humans
  • Octopuses, which are typically asocial creatures, seem to get friendlier while on MDMA, suggesting humans have more in common with the strange invertebrates than previously thought
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Ketamine: A Club Drug That May Be the Future of Antidepressants

Studies and trials point to the potential of a rave drug becoming the newest antidepressant medication in decades.

Early risers take part in a Morning Glory 'Rave Your Way Into The Day!' morning dance experience at Village Underground on September 4, 2013 in Shoreditch, London, England. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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