The U.S. military creates tech to control drones with thoughts

The legendary DARPA tests technology that lets soldiers control drones with their minds.

Getty Images
  • Military researchers have been testing implants that allow the operator to control drones with thoughts.
  • The tech translates thinking into code.
  • More development is necessary.
Keep reading Show less

Researchers Enhance Human Memory with Electrical Stimulation

Someday an implant may help the neurologically impaired overcome a damaged memory. 

 

Participant taking part in a memory study. Airman Magazine.

How good is your memory? It usually varies from person to person. This much is easily recognizable. But did you know that the sharpness of your memory can vary from one day to the next? Those who have had a stroke or a traumatic brain injury (TBI), often face memory impairment. They have limited options to overcome the problem and it hampers their quality of life significantly. 270,000 veterans and active military personnel are living with TBI, currently.

Keep reading Show less

What if Terrorists Got Their Hands on Explosives and a Drone?

There is software that can track drones in open areas, but none that can do so in tight-knit, urban ones. 

 

Is it just a delivery drone or is it carrying a bomb?

Imagine if you will a terrorist cell getting their hands on a drone, or a number of them, and some explosives. No, this is not an episode of 24. The military calls drones unmanned aerial systems (UAS), and they are worried about them. While planes and helicopters are large enough to recognize easily on radar, drones, being smaller, can be mistaken for birds.

Keep reading Show less

NASA’s Titan Sub Mission May Shed Light on How Life Developed on Earth

The mission might set a precedent for exploring bodies of water on other moons and worlds as well. 

 

Titan, Saturn's largest moon.

Of all the bodies in our solar system, Saturn’s moon Titan is one of the likeliest to harbor life. That’s because it has an atmosphere and its surface is covered by lakes and seas of hydrocarbon. Due to this, NASA has proposed a concept for a mission—plunging a robot-driven, nuclear submarine into Titan’s largest, northerly sea, called Kraken Mare. This body of “water” is 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) wide and 300 meters (1,000 feet) deep. It’s as large as Lake Superior. The concept was announced by cryogenics engineer Jason Hartwig, at NASA’s Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Symposium, last August

Keep reading Show less