Facebook co-founder: Every middle-class worker should get a $6,000 raise

It's no secret that American income inequality is at its worst point since the gilded age. So how do we stop this rampant inequality?

It's no secret that American income inequality is at its worst point since the gilded age. To break it down for you, there's a very small yet super-rich class at the top (the 1%), and there's the rest of us (the 99%) who are duking it out in a type of capitalist serfdom. Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder, will be the first to tell you that he's a super lucky guy that happened to benefit massively from this system that makes the rich richer and the poor stay the same. He's come with a plan — give $500 a month to every working adult making less than $50,000 a year — to help reinvigorate the American economy and the American dream that we can pull ourselves up. If the American dream is dead, he says, then what are we fighting for in the first place? His fascinating book is Fair Shot: Rethinking Inequality and How We Earn.

Are Blue States Better at Exemplifying Red State Values? The Data Might Surprise You.

Who actually practices what they preach? Various studies suggest that blue states do a better job at staying married and avoiding teen pregnancy—but like all data, it's not so simple.

Anybody watching the news today will hear that Americans are engaged in a great culture war, with fronts ranging from football to what news we watch to questions of whose rights are at risk. As we all know must be true, the blue states are full of liberals who smoke dope, sleep around, and watch Modern Family, while the red states are full of bible thumpers who drink Tennessee whiskey, are loyal to their spouses, and enjoy Duck Dynasty.

Keep reading Show less

Why People Want to Get Rid of Confederate Statues, as Explained by Plato

There is a philosophical way of looking at the current arguments to remove Confederate statues, and it's one that dates back to Ancient Greece. 

A statue of Confederate general Thomas Jonathan 'Stonewall' Jackson, and a statue of the philosopher Plato.

A great deal of trouble and debate has recently taken place around monuments to Confederate leaders and soldiers in the United States. Both sides have a well-explained position. Supporters of the monuments offer defenses ranging from “Heritage not Hate” down to a frank acceptance, and appreciation, of the avowed white supremacy of the Confederate States of America. Opponents of the monuments cite that exact white supremacy and history of oppression as a reason to demolish the statues.

Keep reading Show less