How to get ahead in work and life, according to a dominatrix

The dominatrix profession demands a mastery of human psychology and the ability to command life's many challenges.

  • Professional dominatrixes develop an intuitive understanding of the human psyche at its most revealing.
  • The techniques pro-dommes use to control their clients can be translated to other endeavors, especially finances and work.
  • Studying the principles of these techniques can help anyone improve a craft or skill.
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How to keep your audience engaged

Tips on telling human stories that audiences want to hear from start to finish.

  • The most important part of being a writer is feeling that you're not important and that the work you're doing is not about you.
  • "A journalist is someone who is willing to disappoint themselves with the truth."
  • Every piece of journalism has a narrative arc, and that arc is integral to any human storytelling.
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7 (more) board games to help kids think big

We catalogue seven more board games to teach children science, problem-solving, and even foster their creativity.

  • The number of board games being released each year is unprecedented.
  • Among the deluge of new and interesting titles, many can help develop life-critical skills, such as creativity, problem solving, and lateral thinking.
  • We look at seven more board games that help teach children to think big.
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Kurt Vonnegut on 8 'shapes' of stories

The American author said he attempted to bring scientific thinking to literary criticism, but received "very little gratitude for this."

  • Kurt Vonnegut wrote a master's thesis on the shapes of stories that he submitted to the anthropology department at the University of Chicago, which rejected it.
  • The late Indiana-born author said it was his "prettiest contribution" to the culture.
  • Vonnegut half-jokingly defended his "scientific" approach to literary criticism over his career, but noted that great stories can't be easily plotted on a diagram.
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John Cleese: ‘Does it make you laugh?’

Laughing is so contagious that we often forget how subjective humor is.

  • People have very subjective senses of humor, which means some jokes may be funny to certain people but not at all for others.
  • It can be hard to notice just how subject humor is because laughter has an infectious effect on people. This phenomenon is especially true in large groups of people.
  • When it comes to reviewing what jokes to put into a show, test it on friends and family to see which parts evoke laughs from them and which parts don't.