How the Confederate flags came down at the University of Mississippi

Twenty years ago, it would have been a difficult proposition to ask the University of Mississippi to take down all the confederate flags on campus. But an angry chancellor, a powerful football coach, and a former alumni highly skilled at public relations all played their part to rid the campus of its turbulent historical reminders.

Harold Burson — one of the co-founders of global public relations firm Burson-Marsteller — has a fascinating story about how the confederate flags came down once and for all at his alma mater, the University of Mississippi. It involves an angry chancellor, a powerful football coach, and a young Harold Burson himself as the former alumni who understood the power of compromise. They all played their part to rid the campus of it's turbulent historical reminders, and Ole Miss is much better for it. Harold's latest book is The Business of Persuasion: Harold Burson on Public Relations.

Why People Want to Get Rid of Confederate Statues, as Explained by Plato

There is a philosophical way of looking at the current arguments to remove Confederate statues, and it's one that dates back to Ancient Greece. 

A statue of Confederate general Thomas Jonathan 'Stonewall' Jackson, and a statue of the philosopher Plato.

A great deal of trouble and debate has recently taken place around monuments to Confederate leaders and soldiers in the United States. Both sides have a well-explained position. Supporters of the monuments offer defenses ranging from “Heritage not Hate” down to a frank acceptance, and appreciation, of the avowed white supremacy of the Confederate States of America. Opponents of the monuments cite that exact white supremacy and history of oppression as a reason to demolish the statues.

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